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Alder Hotel - Uptown - New Orleans
4545 Magnolia St. New Orleans, LA 70115
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Category Archive: Dining Near the Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans

  1. Guide: Navigating the Freret Neighborhood and Uptown New Orleans

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    New Orleans has a lot of offer, as does the Uptown Freret neighborhood where the Alder hotel is located. You’ve probably also done your homework and have your sightseeing, dining and shopping options and preferences lined up. However, the idiosyncrasies of any city might throw off even a seasoned traveler. On top of that, online directions could be unreliable, transportation schedules confusing, and what looks like an easy 10-minute walk on the map might get you lost in an unfamiliar neighborhood.

    That’s why we’d like to help you navigate the Freret neighborhood and beyond with comfort and confidence, to make your stay in Uptown New Orleans as pleasant as possible. Here’s our guide to your transportation options, our top recommendations for places to see, and eat and shop at within walking distance, as well as the options for when you’re looking for a workout or a little pampering, and more.

    Transportation Options

    Parking

    The Alder Hotel offers free self-parking in the parking lot directly across the street. It’s relatively rare to find this amenity in New Orleans, so we hope you take advantage of it. There’s also street parking available near the hotel, but it might be limited depending on time of year and day.

    Streetcar

    The historic St. Charles Avenue streetcar line is within walking distance, about 20 minutes away. The streetcar stops on every block of St. Charles Ave., running from every eight to 20 minutes, depending on time of day and night (although please don’t quote us on that). The fare is $1.25 per person, and you can get passes ranging from one-day passes ($3) to month-long ($55).

    Our preferred and therefore most recommended walking route from the hotel to catch the St. Charles Ave. streetcar is to:

    • Take a left at the hotel’s entrance
    • Take Magnolia St. toward Napoleon Ave.
    • Make a right at Napoleon Ave.
    • Walk down Napoleon Ave. for about 10 blocks until you arrive at St. Charles Ave.

    Bus

    Besides the streetcar, another public transportation option is getting around by bus. There are three lines that stop within walking distance, with the #15 Freret St. line being the closest:

    • #15 Freret and Cadiz streets
    • #16 at S. Claiborne Ave. and Cadiz St.
    • #28 at Napoleon Ave. and Magnolia St.

    Walking

    Our guests often ask if the area near the hotel is safe for walking, and it generally is. Plus, the hotel’s close proximity to the Ochsner Baptist sprawling medical campus means you get the advantage of the dedicated security patrolling the area.

    Getting to the hotel from the airport

    You can get the shuttle service from the airport that will deliver you to our door, for $24.00 per person. Airport Shuttle Inc. is a minibus/van service located at baggage claim. To book your ride, click here.

    Taxi service is also available at baggage claim, with the $36 flat rate for one or two passengers, and $15 per person if more than two passengers are riding.

    Taxicab and ride-share services

    The ride-share options in New Orleans include Uber and Lyft (you can download their apps at the links). There’s also handful of taxicab services servicing the Uptown New Orleans neighborhood. We recommend:

    Distance

    If you are getting to places by car or public transportation:

    • French Quarter: 4.5 miles; a little under 20 minutes by car, depending on traffic
    • Central Business District: 3 miles; 15 minutes by car, 20 by streetcar
    • Warehouse/Arts District: 2.8 miles; 10-15 minutes by car, 20 by public transportation

    Fitness and Spa Services

    Our guests have the opportunity to use the 24/7 Anytime Fitness center (4600 Freret St.) free of charge. It’s located 0.2 miles from the hotel, which takes about five minutes to walk. Please stop by the front desk to check out a key.

    There is also a spa within walking distance, Spa Savoire Faire (5014 Freret St.). It’s a seven-minute walk, for 0.4 miles. Savoire Faire offers coupons for discounts on services. Guests can pick up a coupon from the Concierge at the front desk.

    Pets

    We are a pet-friendly New Orleans hotel. At The Alder Hotel, we welcome dogs and cats, and look forward to hosting you and your pets when you stay in Uptown New Orleans. You can review our pet policy here. If you are traveling with large dogs (over 50 pounds) or would like supervision for your dog while you sightsee, we recommend Zeus’ Place (4601 Freret St.).

    Top 10 Recommendations for Food and Drink Near the Alder hotel

    You’ll find more recommendations specifically for breakfast, brunch, lunch, and snoballs at the links below (see the “Eating and Drinking section), but here are our top 10:

    Bearcat Cafe2521 Jena St.

    Comfort food, vegan and gluten-free options.

    Less than a block off Freret Street and within walking distance of Ochsner Baptist Medical Center and the Tulane and Loyola University area, this full-service cafe offers lunch and breakfast plus micro-sourced, sustainable coffee. The menu is mostly comfort food, divided into “Good Cat” and “Bad Cat” sections. The lighter fare is full of gluten-free and vegan options. The hearty “Bad Cat” offers items like pork chops, burgers, and shrimp BBQ pasta.

    The High Hat Cafe, 4500 Freret St.

    Louisiana cookin’, where catfish and Gulf seafood (and pimento!) are the stars. 

    This casual neighborhood eatery specializes in the Mississippi Delta and Louisiana staples like catfish, Gulf seafood, and slow-roasted pork served along with a long cocktail menu. Pimento cheese is prominently featured in the house burger, specialty fries, and even deviled eggs.

    Bar Frances, 4525 Freret St.

    Wine pairings and small plates in a contemporary bistro setting.

    This airy bistro, located in the thick of Freret Street’s shopping and dining scene, features a large selection of natural wines plus a seasonal menu of small plates. It also offers full breakfast/brunch and dinner menus. During popular daily happy hour you can sip a variety of classic cocktails like Sazerac or Old-Fashioned for less than $10.

    The Company Burger4600 Freret St.

    Award-winning burgers with sides, shakes, and cocktails.

    We also recommend The Company Burger on Freret and Cadiz streets for its solid menu of delicious burgers, fries and milkshakes. The menu keeps it simple with the award-winning lamb, turkey, and beef burgers, plus sides, shakes, and cocktails. The “not burger” options are also kept simple: hot dogs, and grilled cheese and fried chicken sandwiches.

    Mojo Coffee House4700 Freret St.

    A cozy, welcoming hangout where you can grab small-batch roasted coffee, a vegan muffin and connect to wi-fi.

    You won’t find full kitchen service at this laid-back coffee house (the counter-service destination is more of a pastry-and-sandwich place), but for those mornings when you just need caffeine and a quick bite, nothing beats Mojo.

    Humble Bagel4716 Freret St.

    Small-batch, sustainably made bagels.

    Humble Bagel’s creations are made in-house daily, from scratch, with just five ingredients, and in small batches (the proprietors are big on minimizing food waste and using locally sourced ingredients when possible). The place is open till 1 p.m. daily, or until they sell out. The menu is kept simple — bagels, cream cheese, and breakfast combos like eggs, bacon, and lox — and it’s worth getting up early for.

    Cure4905 Freret St.

    Dimly-lit, upscale lounge inside a former firehouse on Freret Street with craft cocktails and small plates.

    A popular destination for cocktail lovers, Cure is a stylish, upscale lounge located inside a renovated firehouse. There you can sip your classic New Orleans cocktails surrounded by bottles of bourbons from around the world, including the hard-to-find, rare and reserve varieties. The well-reviewed menu offers a rotation of frequently changing cocktails made by seasoned mixologists along with small plates and bar snacks. If you’re coming in for lunch on a weekend, it would have to be on a later side, as Cure opens at 3 p.m.

    Blaze Pizza, 5001 Freret St.

    Signature and build-your-own pizzas plus salads in the 2,400 sq. ft. space.

    This is the second location for the Los Angeles-based, LeBron James-backed chain. (The first one opened in 2015 on O’Keefe Avenue in the CBD.) This restaurant is located on Robert Street and Freret near Dat Dog. It’s open till midnight Sun.-Thu., and till 2 a.m. Fri.-Sat. The menu is straightforward, featuring signature pizzas with some vegetarian options, and lots of kid-friendly toppings if you want to BYO pizza.

    Dat Dog5030 Freret St.

    Affordable comfort food includes meat, fish, vegan, and veggie hot dogs and sausages with more than 30 toppings. Dog-friendly outdoor seating.

    Dat Dog’s both Uptown locations (3336 Magazine Street near Louisiana Avenue and 5030 Freret Street near Soniat Street) have dog-friendly outdoor seating, great for people-watching too. At its Freret Street location, the affordable Dat Dog dishes out a wide variety of meat, fish, vegan and veggie hot dogs, sausages, and other kid-friendly comfort food like burgers and chicken. The dogs and the sausages come with a choice of more than 30 toppings.

    Mint Modern Vietnamese Bistro & Bar5100 Freret St.

    Vietnamese classics with modern twists in the bustling corner location in the Freret Street corridor.

    Mint’s streamlined menu is modern indeed, packed with specialty rolls, several varieties of pho, banh mi, and a kimchi burger. One of the unusual specialty cocktails is Fishy Surprise, which is made with whiskey, Drambuie, grapefruit juice, and fish sauce.

    If you want to keep exploring, here’s our collection of resources, from the fun things you can do as a couple, or with your dog, plus where to get the best breakfast, find a comfy co-working spot nearby, and much more.

    Local Attractions & Things to Do

    Things to Do in New Orleans: Year-At-A-Glance

    Alder Hotel’s Top 12 Reasons to Stay in the Freret Neighborhood of Uptown New Orleans

    Your Itinerary: 24-Hours in Uptown New Orleans

    Our Neighborhood — Most Popular Attractions Near the Alder Hotel

    Architectural Landmarks — Uptown New Orleans

    Things to Do on Loyola and Tulane Campuses – Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans

    Essential Stops and Sights Along the St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Route

    A Night on Freret Street

    Rainy Day Fun Near the Alder Hotel

    Eating and Drinking near the Alder Hotel

    10 Dishes That Define New Orleans and Where to Try Them Uptown

    New Orleans Food Bucket List, Uptown Edition

    Where to Get Breakfast Near the Alder Hotel Uptown

    Where to Find Snoballs near the Alder Hotel in Uptown New Orleans

    Coffee, Brunch, Lunch, and Co-Working Near the Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans

    Late Night Eats Uptown New Orleans

    Shopping Uptown

    Shopping Near Alder Hotel Uptown

    Shopping the Freret Market

    Edible Souvenirs From New Orleans

    Family-Friendly Uptown

    Uptown New Orleans: A Family-Friendly Itinerary

    Romantic Uptown

    Fun for Couples in Uptown New Orleans

    Dog-Friendly Uptown

    Fun with Fido in Uptown New Orleans

    Fit Uptown

    Staying Fit in Uptown New Orleans

    Uptown on a Budget

    Exploring Uptown New Orleans on a Budget

  2. Must-Try Po-Boys at the Po-Boy Festival

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    Photo courtesy of Oak Street Po-Boy Festival

    One thing New Orleanians can agree on, the po-boy satisfies hunger like nothing else. The once-humble sandwich has gone high-class in recent years, with top chefs serving their own inventive takes. But you can still find hearty 12-inch versions spilling fried shrimp and oysters for under $15 in local corner stores.

    There will be a po-boy for every budget and palate in New Orleans at the Oak Street Po-Boy Festival on Sunday, November 3, 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. You will be able to sample the best po-boys the city has to offer. The fest will be held between the 8100 and 8800 blocks of Oak Street in the Carrollton neighborhood. About 35 vendors will present more food than you could shake your fork at, with over 60 varieties of the delicious sandwich alone — plus beer, specialty cocktails, and desserts.

    Stages for live music will be set up on side streets to avoid the Oak Street foot-traffic congestion of the past years. A second line will open the fest at 10 a.m., forming at Oak and Carrollton streets.

    Like last year, admission is free, but you have to get a $5 wristband at the fest to purchase the po-boys (it’s OK if one person in the group buys multiple po-boys, according to the event organizers). Hate the long lines? This year attendees can get their hands on the po-boys faster by getting one of the two passes. One option is a $20 “fast pass” to enter through the fast lane.

    The VIP pass ($99) grants access to the Mellow Mushroom on Oak VIP lounge and balcony and the front-row view of the main stage. There you’ll find beer, plus food from the Parkway Bakery and Tavern and other vendors, and specialty cocktails.

    Just like in the past years, some of the best restaurants in the city will once again compete in six “Best of” categories: seafood, oyster, shrimp, sausage, pork, and beef. Past winners included Red Fish Grill’s BBQ oyster po-boy and Bratz Y’all’s Drunk Pig.

    To give you just a taste of what to expect, the Mid-City-based po-boy king Parkway Bakery and Tavern will bring one of its wildly popular signature creations, “The James Brown” po-boy — slow-cooked roast beef topped with fried Gulf shrimp and smothered in gravy. The ever popular Godfather po-boy from Vincent’s Italian Cuisine marries three savory meats: Italian sausage, meatballs and daube meat (beef slow-cooked in a red sauce, like a brisket) and tops them with mozzarella cheese. Redfish Grill will again offer its signature BBQ oyster concoction, flash-fried and tossed in Crystal BBQ sauce. Metairie’s NOLA Boils & Catering kicks it up with an escargot po-boy while Oceana Grill will be offering its oyster Rockefeller po-boy (with housemade sauce).

    There will be plenty of creative concoctions for the adventurous taste buds too, with game, elevated touches, and Asian and Caribbean flavors. An in the dessert category, check out Bananas Foster po-boy from Walkers BBQ (maybe after you try their signature cochon de lait version), and strawberry and Nutella tiramisu po-boy from Crêpes à la Cart.

    As with any fest, there will be an art market and a kids’ area. The festival is rain or shine, pedestrian- and bike-friendly, and pets are welcome. Parking options will be limited, so consider biking or taking the St. Charles Avenue streetcar (get off at the Oak Street stop).

    We can’t wait to see who wins this year!

     

  3. 10 Dishes That Define New Orleans and Where to Try Them Uptown

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    bread-pudding-uptown-new-orleans

    When you think of the must-try food in New Orleans the culinary wonders spread far beyond the French Quarter and the iconic Creole and Cajun restaurants. You can easily find delicious renditions of the New Orleans and southern staples that make the food-bucket lists for very good reasons in many restaurants Uptown. From the ambitious newcomers to the old-world landmarks — there’s much to recommend for you to try.

    There’s a slew of restaurants along the St. Charles Avenue streetcar route, so you can hop on and off the streetcar while sampling your way between Canal Street and the Riverbend. The commercial stretches of Magazine and Freret streets are also packed with restaurants and cafes, many with ample sidewalk and balcony seating. Here’s a list of our favorite dishes that define New Orleans and where to try them Uptown.

    1. Bread Pudding

    What do you do with the leftover French bread? You make a classic Creole dessert, the bread pudding!

    Where to try it: One of the best places in the city to try it is at Commander’s Palace. This grand dame of Creole cuisine is a beloved landmark that’s been occupying a tree-lined block across the street from Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 in the Garden District. Along with the turtle soup, the Commander’s version of this dish is legendary. Dubbed the “Queen of Creole Desserts,” the Creole Bread Pudding Soufflé is bread pudding whipped into a light fluffy soufflé, served with whiskey sauce added tableside.

    1. Gumbo

    One of Louisiana’s most famous dishes, excellent gumbo is easy to find anywhere in New Orleans, it just depends whether you like your gumbo with darker or lighter roux, and with meat or seafood (or laden with both). Most restaurants include at least two versions on the menu, the meat and the seafood, and tend not to stray too far from the classic Cajun and Creole recipes.

    Where to try it: At Pascal’s Manale, for one. This family-owned institution is over 100 years old, and its chicken andouille gumbo is excellent. Gumbo du Jour is whatever Chef Tory McPhail wants to create on any given day at Commander’s Palace, but we can guarantee that it will be exceptional. Or pair your seafood, or chicken and Andouille gumbo at Frankie & Johnny’s with the restaurant’s famous red beans and rice. The High Hat Cafe also offers great gumbo (we also recommend its fried catfish). Part old-fashioned diner, part neighborhood bar and part Deep South food destination, the High Hat Cafe is located in a once sleepy neighborhood thoroughfare bordering Tulane University. Now revitalized, the Freret Street corridor is a food and entertainment destination in its own right. Another plus? It’s only two blocks from the Alder Hotel.

    1. Jambalaya

    This flavorful one-pot, rice-based dish is right up there with gumbo when it comes to the well-deserved international fame, and can be found in many New Orleans restaurants. This staple traditionally incorporates stock, meat, seafood, long-grain rice, and vegetables (like the “holy trinity” also used in gumbo — bell pepper, onion and celery). The main distinction is that the Creole version has tomatoes and the Cajun recipe does not.

    Where to try it: We highly recommend the Creole jambalaya at Jacques-Imo’s, which comes as an appetizer, but, really, so many restaurants do it really well it’s difficult to single out the true standouts.

    1. Pain Perdu

    This breakfast and brunch mainstay means “lost bread,” referring to the dish’s ability to resurrect stale and otherwise lost to most purposes bread. For this version of French toast French bread is soaked in eggs and milk and then fried (sometimes deep-fried) or grilled, which results in a crisp and buttery exterior and a soft and custardy inside.

    Where to try it: Surrey’s Cafe and Juice Bar, hands down. Surrey’s has two locations, both Uptown on Magazine Street. Its acclaimed Pain Perdu part of the full breakfast menu of Southern staples. You can wash down this fluffy, sugar-coated gem with one of Surrey’s incredible organic juices.

    1. Po-Boys

     A po-boy is a sandwich (just please don’t call it that) that comes in as many versions as there are ingredients to stuff inside a loaf of French bread. Some of the classics are fried seafood, like oysters or shrimp, but the ingredients vary all the way up to French fries. 

    Where to try it: Jacque Imo’s, Guy’s Po-Boys, Mahony’s, Domilise’s Po-Boy & Bar, Zara’s Lil’ Giant Supermarket & Po-boys — the list goes on, and depends on whether you want to enjoy your po-boy to go or on premises. The cash-only lunch staple Guy’s and Zara’s the grocery market are more casual, while the restaurants are the sit-down affairs.

    1. Raw Oysters

    One of the quintessential New Orleans food experiences is having a dozen raw, and the deals are especially sweet during the happy hour.

    Where to try it: Head to the Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar, located in a high-ceilinged, imposing building on the corner of St. Charles and Napoleon Avenues with some of the best views of St. Charles Avenue in the city. The full-service oyster bar doles out 50-cent raw oysters during the popular happy hour, which you can enjoy with Superior’s signature frozen pomegranate mojito.

    Also on the streetcar’s route on St. Charles Avenue, Luke offers a deal on raw oysters for its happy hour (75 cents), complemented by the French/German menu. If you’d like a really well-made martini with your dozen raw, head to the iconic Pascal’s Manale, where oysters are shucked right in front of you and a happy hour is a decades-long tradition.

    1. Red Beans and Rice

    In the past, Monday was traditionally laundry day in New Orleans, and also the day for having red beans and rice. Our laundry schedules aren’t that rigid anymore, but you can still find a delicious plate of beans and rice around town, usually accompanied by a hunk of smoked sausage. While many restaurants still feature it as a Monday special, you can still find on many menus on any day of the week.

    Where to try it: Uptown, we recommend the renditions served up at Joey K’s (as a cup standalone or with smoked sausage) or at Gris-Gris (complimentary, on Mondays).

    1. Snoballs

    If you’re here in March through October no New Orleans visit would be complete with trying a local snoball. These heavenly, frozen concoctions of finely shaved ice and flavored cane sugar syrup are uniquely Southern and come with an explosion of favors.

    Where to try it: Your best options near the Alder Hotel are SnoWizard Snoball Shoppe with a creamy and sweet Mexican vanilla flavor as one of the standouts, or Plum Street Snoballs. Pink lemonade, bananas Foster, nectar cream, and vanilla orchid cream are just a few flavors you’ll find at this cash-only joint with ample outdoor seating. Another New Orleans treat, yakamein, is available alongside classic snoballs at Red Rooster Snoball Stand (open year round; look for Yet-Ca-Mein on the menu).

    1. Southern Breakfast Staples

    This is a loose term for a few of the New Orleans breakfast and brunch staples, including eggs done every which way, plus the ubiquitous shrimp and grits and biscuits and gravy. Many places do all those things right, but a few stand out. For instance, the Mardi Gras sandwich at Camellia Grill is a must try. Stuffed with turkey, bacon and corned beef, it’s a meal in itself, and worth joining a fast-moving line of students, visitors and locals waiting for a seat. The classic 1940s diner is also famous for its grilled pecan pie and cherry-chocolate slushies, served by the white-jacketed staff.

    Another inexpensive local hangout with Southern staples and plenty of local color, the upbeat Slim Goodies Diner does many different kinds of scrambles, from meaty to vegan, called slammers. Try the Creole slammer, which comes with a biscuit, crawfish étouffée and hash browns.

    A locally owned mini-chain with one location Uptown, Ruby Slipper hits all the right notes when it comes to brunch mainstays but with a distinctly Louisiana twists. This brunch queen’s acclaimed house specialty is BBQ shrimp and grits.

    1. Turtle Soup

    This Louisiana classic is considered a delicacy in many cultures across the globe. The silky Creole version, served with a touch of sherry (and sometimes with grated or chopped egg, and more sherry tableside), can be found in many classic New Orleans restaurants that serve Creole dishes.

    Where to try it: Everything you decide to try on Chef Tory McPhail’s haute Creole menu at Commander’s Palace will be top notch, but the turtle soup is a must. You’ll also love the iconic Upperline and its turtle soup. Hands down one of the most romantic Uptown restaurants, this award-winning local favorite has been housed in an 1877 townhouse for decades. Thanks to the owner and hostess, JoAnn Clevenger, who is a collector, Upperline’s walls and shelves are covered with hundreds of paintings, pottery, sculpture, photography, and Jazz Fest posters. The menu is elevated contemporary Creole, and there’s a three-course prix fixe option if you’re not sure what to get.

    We hope you try all these classic New Orleans dishes while you explore Uptown!

  4. New Orleans Food Bucket List, Uptown Edition

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    When you think of the must-try food in New Orleans the culinary wonders spread far beyond the French Quarter and the iconic Creole and Cajun restaurants. It seems there’s a handful of new places opening every month, adding to the stellar roster of delicious food you’ll likely won’t find anywhere else. Then there are the old (sometimes decades- or even centuries-old) favorites that make the food-bucket lists for very good reasons. The Uptown area is no exception — from the ambitious newcomers to the old-world landmarks — there’s much to recommend for you to try. Here’s just a sampler of our favorites.

    There’s a slew of restaurants along the St. Charles Avenue streetcar route, so you can hop on and off the streetcar while sampling your way between Canal Street and the Riverbend. For breakfast or brunch, try the Mardi Gras sandwich at Camellia Grill (626 Carrollton Ave.), a classic 1940s diner where white-jacketed staff members serve up delicacies ranging from grilled pecan pie to cherry-chocolate slushies. Stuffed with turkey, bacon and corned beef, it’s a meal in itself, and worth joining a fast-moving line of Tulane students, tourists and locals waiting for a seat.

    Another inexpensive local hangout with Southern staples and plenty of local color, the upbeat Slim Goodies Diner (3322 Magazine St.) does many different kinds of scrambles, from meaty to vegan, called slammers. Try the Creole slammer, which comes with a biscuit, crawfish étouffée and hash browns. And, the locally sourced green eggs and ham breakfast sandwich at Satsuma’s Uptown location (7901 Maple St.) comes with a serious coffee selection. The green part is basil pesto, by the way.

    For oysters, head to Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar (4338 St. Charles Ave.), located in a high-ceilinged, imposing building on the corner of St. Charles and Napoleon Avenues with some of the best views of St. Charles Avenue in the city. The full-service oyster bar doles out 50-cent raw oysters during the popular happy hour, which you can enjoy with Superior’s signature frozen pomegranate mojito.

    Also on the streetcar’s route, Luke (333 St. Charles Ave.) offers a deal on raw oysters for its happy hour (75 cents), complemented by Executive Chef Erick Loos’ French/German menu. The menu’s seasonal ingredients come from the Gulf and local farms and are highlighted in dishes like stuffed P&J oysters, and Creole seafood and sausage gumbo. If you’d like a really well-made martini with your dozen raw, head to the iconic Pascal Manale (1838 Napoleon Ave.), where oysters are shucked right in front of you and a happy hour is a decades-long tradition.

    Everything is worth trying at the James Beard Award winner Chef Donald Link’s wildly popular restaurant Herbsaint (701 St. Charles Ave.). Herbsaint predates Katrina and remains the flagship of the Link Restaurant Group (which runs several businesses including Peche, Cochon and La Boulangerie). Herbsaint has been, and continues to be, on many “Best Restaurants” list, for reasons that will become clear as soon as you dig into its crispy goat, or shrimp and fish ceviche. The French-Southern menu sports some Italian influences (evident in the presence of housemade gnocchi and spaghetti), with a spotlight on local, seasonal produce and sustainably sourced seafood and meats.

    For an outstanding gumbo and fried catfish head to High Hat Cafe (4500 Freret St.). Part old-fashioned diner, part neighborhood bar and part Deep South food destination, High Hat Cafe is located in a once sleepy neighborhood thoroughfare bordering Tulane University. Now revitalized, the Freret Street corridor is a food and entertainment destination in its own right. Another plus? It’s only two blocks from the Alder Hotel.

    For lighter fare, like a well-curated cheese board, perhaps paired with a glass of wine, check out St. James Cheese Company (5004 Prytania St.), also home of the kid-friendly $5 Mini Moo sandwich. Wine and small plates rule at Bar Frances (4525 Freret St.), a lovely bistro with a seasonal menu and a large selection of natural wines, so that’s another solid bet for a great cheese plate. Yet another contender in that category is Cure (4905 Freret St.), a chic, dimly lit craft cocktail bar with a leafy patio and award-winning concoctions.

    For something more substantial, the romantic La Crepe Nanou, located on the corner of Robert and Prytania Streets, a fantastic selection of sweet and savory crepes. Patois (6078 Laurel St.), helmed by Chef Aaron Burgau, puts a local spin on mussels, grilled Gulf shrimp and southern staples like sweetbreads in a lovely, softly-lit setting.

    For authentic Sicilian cuisine by the renowned Chef Nick Lama head to Avo (5908 Magazine St.). The seasonal menu is bursting with seafood (try the charred octopus) and homemade pasta dishes. The interior is gorgeous, but see if you can score a table in the candlelit courtyard.

    For a taste of Creole New Orleans like turtle soup and fried green tomatoes, the iconic Upperline (1413 Upperline St.) is a must-try. Hands down one of the most romantic Uptown restaurants, this award-winning local favorite has been housed in an 1877 townhouse for decades. Thanks to the owner and hostess, JoAnn Clevenger, who is collector, Upperline’s walls and shelves are covered with hundreds of paintings, pottery, sculpture, photography, and JazzFest posters. The menu is elevated contemporary Creole, and there’s a three-course prix fixe option if you’re not sure what to get.

    Another grand dame of Creole cuisine, Commander’s Palace (1403 Washington Ave.) is a beloved landmark that’s been occupying a tree-lined block across the street from Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 in the Garden District. Everything you decide to try on Chef Tory McPhail’s haute Creole menu will be top notch, but the turtle soup and Creole bread pudding soufflé (dubbed the “Queen of Creole Desserts”) are a must.

    For satisfying lunch options, try the house burger at The Company Burger (4600 Freret St.). It comes with a fried egg, two patties, and bacon. And all hot dogs at Dat Dog (with two Uptown locations, 3336 Magazine St. and 5030 Freret St.) come with a choice of more than 30 toppings. Both locations also have dog-friendly outdoor seating.

    If you’re here in March through October no New Orleans visit would be complete with trying a local snoball. These heavenly, frozen concoctions of finely shaved ice and flavored cane sugar syrup are uniquely Southern and come with an explosion of favors. Your best options near the Alder Hotel are SnoWizard Snoball Shoppe (4001 Magazine St.) with a creamy and sweet Mexican vanilla flavor as one of the standouts, or Plum Street Snoballs (1300 Burdette St.). Pink lemonade, bananas Foster, nectar cream, and vanilla orchid cream are just a few flavors you’ll find at this cash-only joint with ample outdoor seating. Another New Orleans treat, yakamein, is available alongside classic snoballs at Red Rooster Snoball Stand (2801 Washington Ave.).

    For more dessert options, we heartily recommend small-batch, handcrafted Italian gelato at Piccola Gelateria (4525 Freret St.), which comes in classic and experimental flavors including bananas Foster, caramelized fig, and pistachio. Finally, Sucre (3225 Magazine St.) cannot be beat for its Parisian patisserie feel and amazing macaroons the whole family could enjoy. 

    Bon appetit!

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