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Alder Hotel - Uptown - New Orleans
4545 Magnolia St. New Orleans, LA 70115
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Author Archives: FrenchMarket

  1. Essential Stops and Sights Along the St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Route

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    St. Charles Avenue Streetcar by Sharon Mollerus on flickr

    Essential Stops and Sights Along the St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Route

    There’s a way to see New Orleans’ Uptown, Garden District, Carrollton, and Central Business District (CBD) neighborhoods that’s historically accurate, affordable and entertaining. It’s called the St. Charles Avenue streetcar, and a ride costs $1.25. Best of all, the streetcar stop is less than a mile away from the Alder Hotel — about a 15-minute walk. Here’s what to know before you go and which destinations are worth a visit, organized by street addresses as you head further Uptown and then downtown.

    Streetcar Facts

    Stroll to the intersection of St. Charles Avenue and Cadiz streets, where the streetcar stops. If you want to head downtown, stand on the riverside (south) of St. Charles Avenue. If you are heading further Uptown, stand on the lakeside (north) of St. Charles Avenue. Have exact change — $1.25 for a one-way ride, or $3 for a Jazzy Pass, which gives you unlimited rides for the day.

    Pay the driver and settle into a vintage mahogany bench. St. Charles Avenue streetcars are not air-conditioned and are not wheelchair accessible, although that will change soon (the city’s other lines using red, not green, streetcars are wheelchair accessible, by the way).

    To make a stop, simply pull the horizontal cord running across your window to signal to the driver that you want to get off. Ideally, you should exit using the rear doors, but this recommendation is often ignored by the locals and visitors alike.

    Stop 1: Audubon Park (6500 Magazine St.)

    Begin your streetcar adventure by heading further Uptown to Audubon Park. You should see the live oak trees, running paths, lakes, and playground equipment from the streetcar, but if not, just pull the cord when you hit Calhoun Street. Take a stroll through the 350-acre public park, where New Orleanians have come to relax since 1898. At the very rear of the park lies the Audubon Zoo. The elephants, tigers, white alligators, monkeys, and other animals make a visit to this beautifully landscaped zoo a must.

    Stop 2: Tulane and Loyola Universities (6363-6823 St. Charles Ave.)

    You’ll spot the campuses of Tulane and Loyola universities right across Audubon Park. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places, Tulane University’s campus occupies more than 110 acres and extends north to S. Claiborne Avenue through Freret and Willow streets. From the Italian Renaissance to Mid-Century Modern, the campus boasts many styles and is known for its large live oak trees.

    Loyola’s sprawling main campus also faces St. Charles Avenue the Audubon Park. Marquette Hall is the oldest campus building and is the iconic image of the university you’ll probably recognize the most. Both campuses deserve a walkthrough thanks to their architectural significance and well-landscaped grounds.

    Stop 3: Newcomb Art Museum (6823 St. Charles Ave.)

    This museum sits on Tulane University’s campus, and it is free and open to the public. Past and present exhibitions have focused on works by contemporary abstractionists and contributions by women artists in the multi-disciplinary fields spanning art and design. Be sure you have a map handy, and check hours before you go, as the museum is closed on Sundays and Mondays, and between exhibitions.

    Stop 4: Camellia Grill (626 Carrollton Ave.)

    By this time, you’ve probably worked up an appetite. Head further Uptown, to the Riverbend area, and hop off at the Camellia Grill, a classic diner where white-jacketed staff members serve up delicacies ranging from grilled pecan pie to cheeseburgers and cherry-chocolate slushies. There may be a line of Tulane students, tourists and locals waiting for a seat, but it’s well worth the delay. Get in line and find out why Camellia Grill has been an institution since 1946.

    Stop 5: Circle Bar (1032 St. Charles Ave.)

    At this point, it’s probably happy hour somewhere — which means it’s time to kick back with a drink. Take the streetcar downtown to the traffic circle (don’t forget to feast your eyes on the palatial St. Charles Avenue estates as you pass). At the Lee Circle, step inside Circle Bar, a cozy venue that feels as intimate as a friend’s house and offers a nightly eclectic mix of live music ranging from country to metal to hip-hop.

    Stop 6: Ogden Museum of Southern Art (925 Camp St.)

    To get to the Ogden, also get off at the Lee Circle. You’ll find this museum a block away on Camp Street, which runs parallel to St. Charles Avenue. The Ogden puts a spotlight on the visual arts and culture of the American South, holding some of the largest and most comprehensive collections of Southern art in the U.S. The museum was founded in 1999 with donation of more than 600 works from New Orleans businessman Roger H. Ogden’s private collection, and has grown since to include more than 4,000 works.

    Stop 7: Contemporary Arts Center (CAC) (900 Camp St.)

    The CAC is a must-stop and a Warehouse District staple, with an impressive roster of events ranging from world-class visual arts exhibitions to performing arts shows. There’s always something cooking up at this vibrant cultural hub: art camps, workshops, avant-garde music shows, and much more. The building, a historic 1905 warehouse located between Andrew Higgins Drive and St. Joseph Street one block from Lee Circle, is a sight to behold. Inside, it’s a 30,000 square-foot dazzling maze of sunlit open spaces, site-specific art installations, theaters, studios, and an atrium.

    If you happen to be here in August, the CAC hosts a massive and popular White Linen Night on the month’s first Saturday. The first Saturday in October is reserved for another important art happening, Art for Art’ Sake. The CAC’s party calendar is full year-round, however, with the venue hosting everything from the world-renowned jazz musicians to burlesque to beloved Louisiana acts like Lost Bayou Ramblers.

    Stop 8: Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar (4338 St. Charles Ave.)

    You can’t miss the imposing building on the corner of St. Charles and Napoleon Avenues, so hop right off for some seafood-centric Creole fare with some of the best views of St. Charles Avenue in the city (and some prime parade-watching spots if you’re here during Mardi Gras). The decor has a lot going for itself too: gigantic windows, a 32-foot zinc bar imported from France, vintage wood floors and beadboard ceilings salvaged from the New Orleans’ long-gone landmarks, antique French dining chairs, oversize wall mirrors, and porch and patio seating.

    The menu is Louisiana classics, from po-boys to whatever fresh catch is swimming in the Gulf. Take advantage of the popular happy hour and a full-service oyster bar: the raw oysters are a steal, washed down with Superior’s signature frozen pomegranate mojito.

    Stop 9: The Avenue Pub (1732 St Charles Ave.)

    This iconic Lower Garden District pub boasts fireplaces, tin ceilings, a balcony overlooking St. Charles Avenue, a pool table, and sidewalk and patio seating. The downstairs bar is open 24/7 and the small kitchen churns out quality pub grub. The menu is limited and can’t accommodate food allergies, but you’re guaranteed at least a burger and fries. For beer nerds, the daily tap rotating menu is posted online.

     Stop 10: Marcello’s Restaurant & Wine Bar (715 St. Charles Ave.)

    Marcello’s is family-owned and operated, with locations in Lafayette and Baton Rouge in addition to New Orleans. It’s classy/casual, with a large wine selection and Sicilian & Northern Italian fare like mussels and the antipasti board. You can select your bottle of wine from Marcello’s racks as you would in a store, at prices below the traditional restaurant wine list markups. The restaurant is located in a historic 1930s building and has outdoor seating.

     Stop 11: Herbsaint (701 St. Charles Ave.)

    James Beard Award winner Chef Donald Link’s wildly popular restaurant predates Katrina and remains the flagship of the Link Restaurant Group (which runs several businesses including Peche, Cochon, and La Boulangerie). Herbsaint has been and continues to be on many “Best Restaurants” list for reasons that will become clear as soon as you dig into its crispy goat, or shrimp and fish ceviche — or anything. The menu is best described as French-Southern, with some Italian influences (evident in the presence of housemade gnocchi and spaghetti), with a spotlight on local, seasonal produce and sustainably sourced seafood and meats.

    Herbsaint offers a great view on St. Charles Avenue and outdoor seating. Ask the knowledgeable staff for pairing recommendations off the restaurant’s eclectic wine list.

    Stop 12: Desi Vega’s Steakhouse (628 St. Charles Ave.)

    Desi Vega’s Steakhouse is an elegant, high-ceilinged space with street views and lots of room. It’s located inside the Lafayette Hotel, a French Regency-style 1916 landmark overlooking Lafayette Square. The menu is classic ribeye and filet mignon, seafood and sides, but with local touches like Andouille and crawfish mac ‘n’ cheese named after Freddie McAfee, a former New Orleans Saints player. Two full bars are flank the staircase at Desi Vega, with a daily happy hour.

    Spot 13: Gallier Hall (545 St. Charles Ave.)

    This historic Greek Revival building overlooks the charming Lafayette Square in New Orleans’ Central Business District (CBD) and has a colorful past. Built in 1845–53, it used to house the City Hall, has hosted many events during the Reconstruction and Huey Long eras, and is still in use today. Such important New Orleans figures as Jefferson Davis, General Beauregard, and, most recently, the local R&B legend Ernie K-Doe lay in state in Gallier Hall. It also remains a focal point of the Uptown Mardi Gras parades.

    The building is considered to be one of the finest works of architect James Gallier, standing three stories tall and featuring Tuckahoe marble and two rows of fluted Ionic columns. Inside, Gallier Hall is a treasure trove of grand ballrooms full of paintings, antique frames and mirrors, clocks, Steinway pianos, and dozens of chandeliers. A large-scale renovation has been completed in March 2018 as part of the city’s tricentennial celebration, refurbishing the period details and installing state-of-the-art A/V system.

    Stop 14: Luke (333 St. Charles Ave.)

    Luke joins an impressive roster of CBD’s notable restaurants with its prime location and a brasserie vibe. Executive Chef Erick Loos helms the kitchen, and his French/German menu has a Creole flavor and highlights fresh, seasonal ingredients that come from the Gulf and local farms in dishes like stuffed Gulf oysters, and Creole seafood and sausage gumbo. The elegant dining space contains a raw bar, and you can get raw oysters for a bargain during Luke’s happy hour. Other highlights are Luke’s massive burger and its famous French 75 as well as other bartender-created specialty cocktails.

    Well, there you have it. From there, you can walk or take the streetcar down to Canal Street to kick off a night in the French Quarter, or ride back Uptown and call it a night. Either way, you’ll have gotten in a full day of sightseeing, eating and drinking.

  2. Guide: Navigating the Freret Neighborhood and Uptown New Orleans

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    New Orleans has a lot of offer, as does the Uptown Freret neighborhood where the Alder hotel is located. You’ve probably also done your homework and have your sightseeing, dining and shopping options and preferences lined up. However, the idiosyncrasies of any city might throw off even a seasoned traveler. On top of that, online directions could be unreliable, transportation schedules confusing, and what looks like an easy 10-minute walk on the map might get you lost in an unfamiliar neighborhood.

    That’s why we’d like to help you navigate the Freret neighborhood and beyond with comfort and confidence, to make your stay in Uptown New Orleans as pleasant as possible. Here’s our guide to your transportation options, our top recommendations for places to see, and eat and shop at within walking distance, as well as the options for when you’re looking for a workout or a little pampering, and more.

    Transportation Options

    Parking

    The Alder Hotel offers free self-parking in the parking lot directly across the street. It’s relatively rare to find this amenity in New Orleans, so we hope you take advantage of it. There’s also street parking available near the hotel, but it might be limited depending on time of year and day.

    Streetcar

    The historic St. Charles Avenue streetcar line is within walking distance, about 20 minutes away. The streetcar stops on every block of St. Charles Ave., running from every eight to 20 minutes, depending on time of day and night (although please don’t quote us on that). The fare is $1.25 per person, and you can get passes ranging from one-day passes ($3) to month-long ($55).

    Our preferred and therefore most recommended walking route from the hotel to catch the St. Charles Ave. streetcar is to:

    • Take a left at the hotel’s entrance
    • Take Magnolia St. toward Napoleon Ave.
    • Make a right at Napoleon Ave.
    • Walk down Napoleon Ave. for about 10 blocks until you arrive at St. Charles Ave.

    Bus

    Besides the streetcar, another public transportation option is getting around by bus. There are three lines that stop within walking distance, with the #15 Freret St. line being the closest:

    • #15 Freret and Cadiz streets
    • #16 at S. Claiborne Ave. and Cadiz St.
    • #28 at Napoleon Ave. and Magnolia St.

    Walking

    Our guests often ask if the area near the hotel is safe for walking, and it generally is. Plus, the hotel’s close proximity to the Ochsner Baptist sprawling medical campus means you get the advantage of the dedicated security patrolling the area.

    Getting to the hotel from the airport

    You can get the shuttle service from the airport that will deliver you to our door, for $24.00 per person. Airport Shuttle Inc. is a minibus/van service located at baggage claim. To book your ride, click here.

    Taxi service is also available at baggage claim, with the $36 flat rate for one or two passengers, and $15 per person if more than two passengers are riding.

    Taxicab and ride-share services

    The ride-share options in New Orleans include Uber and Lyft (you can download their apps at the links). There’s also handful of taxicab services servicing the Uptown New Orleans neighborhood. We recommend:

    Distance

    If you are getting to places by car or public transportation:

    • French Quarter: 4.5 miles; a little under 20 minutes by car, depending on traffic
    • Central Business District: 3 miles; 15 minutes by car, 20 by streetcar
    • Warehouse/Arts District: 2.8 miles; 10-15 minutes by car, 20 by public transportation

    Fitness and Spa Services

    Our guests have the opportunity to use the 24/7 Anytime Fitness center (4600 Freret St.) free of charge. It’s located 0.2 miles from the hotel, which takes about five minutes to walk. Please stop by the front desk to check out a key.

    There is also a spa within walking distance, Spa Savoire Faire (5014 Freret St.). It’s a seven-minute walk, for 0.4 miles. Savoire Faire offers coupons for discounts on services. Guests can pick up a coupon from the Concierge at the front desk.

    Pets

    We are a pet-friendly New Orleans hotel. At The Alder Hotel, we welcome dogs and cats, and look forward to hosting you and your pets when you stay in Uptown New Orleans. You can review our pet policy here. If you are traveling with large dogs (over 50 pounds) or would like supervision for your dog while you sightsee, we recommend Zeus’ Place (4601 Freret St.).

    Top 10 Recommendations for Food and Drink Near the Alder hotel

    You’ll find more recommendations specifically for breakfast, brunch, lunch, and snoballs at the links below (see the “Eating and Drinking section), but here are our top 10:

    Bearcat Cafe2521 Jena St.

    Comfort food, vegan and gluten-free options.

    Less than a block off Freret Street and within walking distance of Ochsner Baptist Medical Center and the Tulane and Loyola University area, this full-service cafe offers lunch and breakfast plus micro-sourced, sustainable coffee. The menu is mostly comfort food, divided into “Good Cat” and “Bad Cat” sections. The lighter fare is full of gluten-free and vegan options. The hearty “Bad Cat” offers items like pork chops, burgers, and shrimp BBQ pasta.

    The High Hat Cafe, 4500 Freret St.

    Louisiana cookin’, where catfish and Gulf seafood (and pimento!) are the stars. 

    This casual neighborhood eatery specializes in the Mississippi Delta and Louisiana staples like catfish, Gulf seafood, and slow-roasted pork served along with a long cocktail menu. Pimento cheese is prominently featured in the house burger, specialty fries, and even deviled eggs.

    Bar Frances, 4525 Freret St.

    Wine pairings and small plates in a contemporary bistro setting.

    This airy bistro, located in the thick of Freret Street’s shopping and dining scene, features a large selection of natural wines plus a seasonal menu of small plates. It also offers full breakfast/brunch and dinner menus. During popular daily happy hour you can sip a variety of classic cocktails like Sazerac or Old-Fashioned for less than $10.

    The Company Burger4600 Freret St.

    Award-winning burgers with sides, shakes, and cocktails.

    We also recommend The Company Burger on Freret and Cadiz streets for its solid menu of delicious burgers, fries and milkshakes. The menu keeps it simple with the award-winning lamb, turkey, and beef burgers, plus sides, shakes, and cocktails. The “not burger” options are also kept simple: hot dogs, and grilled cheese and fried chicken sandwiches.

    Mojo Coffee House4700 Freret St.

    A cozy, welcoming hangout where you can grab small-batch roasted coffee, a vegan muffin and connect to wi-fi.

    You won’t find full kitchen service at this laid-back coffee house (the counter-service destination is more of a pastry-and-sandwich place), but for those mornings when you just need caffeine and a quick bite, nothing beats Mojo.

    Humble Bagel4716 Freret St.

    Small-batch, sustainably made bagels.

    Humble Bagel’s creations are made in-house daily, from scratch, with just five ingredients, and in small batches (the proprietors are big on minimizing food waste and using locally sourced ingredients when possible). The place is open till 1 p.m. daily, or until they sell out. The menu is kept simple — bagels, cream cheese, and breakfast combos like eggs, bacon, and lox — and it’s worth getting up early for.

    Cure4905 Freret St.

    Dimly-lit, upscale lounge inside a former firehouse on Freret Street with craft cocktails and small plates.

    A popular destination for cocktail lovers, Cure is a stylish, upscale lounge located inside a renovated firehouse. There you can sip your classic New Orleans cocktails surrounded by bottles of bourbons from around the world, including the hard-to-find, rare and reserve varieties. The well-reviewed menu offers a rotation of frequently changing cocktails made by seasoned mixologists along with small plates and bar snacks. If you’re coming in for lunch on a weekend, it would have to be on a later side, as Cure opens at 3 p.m.

    Blaze Pizza, 5001 Freret St.

    Signature and build-your-own pizzas plus salads in the 2,400 sq. ft. space.

    This is the second location for the Los Angeles-based, LeBron James-backed chain. (The first one opened in 2015 on O’Keefe Avenue in the CBD.) This restaurant is located on Robert Street and Freret near Dat Dog. It’s open till midnight Sun.-Thu., and till 2 a.m. Fri.-Sat. The menu is straightforward, featuring signature pizzas with some vegetarian options, and lots of kid-friendly toppings if you want to BYO pizza.

    Dat Dog5030 Freret St.

    Affordable comfort food includes meat, fish, vegan, and veggie hot dogs and sausages with more than 30 toppings. Dog-friendly outdoor seating.

    Dat Dog’s both Uptown locations (3336 Magazine Street near Louisiana Avenue and 5030 Freret Street near Soniat Street) have dog-friendly outdoor seating, great for people-watching too. At its Freret Street location, the affordable Dat Dog dishes out a wide variety of meat, fish, vegan and veggie hot dogs, sausages, and other kid-friendly comfort food like burgers and chicken. The dogs and the sausages come with a choice of more than 30 toppings.

    Mint Modern Vietnamese Bistro & Bar5100 Freret St.

    Vietnamese classics with modern twists in the bustling corner location in the Freret Street corridor.

    Mint’s streamlined menu is modern indeed, packed with specialty rolls, several varieties of pho, banh mi, and a kimchi burger. One of the unusual specialty cocktails is Fishy Surprise, which is made with whiskey, Drambuie, grapefruit juice, and fish sauce.

    If you want to keep exploring, here’s our collection of resources, from the fun things you can do as a couple, or with your dog, plus where to get the best breakfast, find a comfy co-working spot nearby, and much more.

    Local Attractions & Things to Do

    Things to Do in New Orleans: Year-At-A-Glance

    Alder Hotel’s Top 12 Reasons to Stay in the Freret Neighborhood of Uptown New Orleans

    Your Itinerary: 24-Hours in Uptown New Orleans

    Our Neighborhood — Most Popular Attractions Near the Alder Hotel

    Architectural Landmarks — Uptown New Orleans

    Things to Do on Loyola and Tulane Campuses – Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans

    Essential Stops and Sights Along the St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Route

    A Night on Freret Street

    Rainy Day Fun Near the Alder Hotel

    Eating and Drinking near the Alder Hotel

    10 Dishes That Define New Orleans and Where to Try Them Uptown

    New Orleans Food Bucket List, Uptown Edition

    Where to Get Breakfast Near the Alder Hotel Uptown

    Where to Find Snoballs near the Alder Hotel in Uptown New Orleans

    Coffee, Brunch, Lunch, and Co-Working Near the Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans

    Late Night Eats Uptown New Orleans

    Shopping Uptown

    Shopping Near Alder Hotel Uptown

    Shopping the Freret Market

    Edible Souvenirs From New Orleans

    Family-Friendly Uptown

    Uptown New Orleans: A Family-Friendly Itinerary

    Romantic Uptown

    Fun for Couples in Uptown New Orleans

    Dog-Friendly Uptown

    Fun with Fido in Uptown New Orleans

    Fit Uptown

    Staying Fit in Uptown New Orleans

    Uptown on a Budget

    Exploring Uptown New Orleans on a Budget

  3. Guide to the New Orleans Art Markets

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    French Market

    There are a few quality indoor and open-air art markets in New Orleans, so you have choices all year round in addition to all the great galleries in the French Quarter, Warehouse District, and on Magazine Street Uptown. Prices range from a few bucks to four digits, and the options are plentiful, from the souvenir trinkets to unique local art. Whatever you’re on the hunt for, you can find a piece of art with your name on it at these New Orleans art markets.

    Artists of Jackson Square

     Where: 700 Chartres Street, Jackson Square, French Quarter

     Where: Open daily

     Hours: 5:30 a.m. – 11 p.m.

     Although technically not a market under any organization’s umbrella, the art lined along the fence and on the sidewalks of Jackson Square and the Pontalba buildings flanking it often rivals what you might find in a gallery on Julia Street. The loose, self-regulated colony of artists that, weather permitting, displays their original artwork day in and day out, is as essential to the scene as the historic buildings themselves. All vendors have a permit from the city, and quite a few of them have been selling in Jackson Square for decades. You’ll find them all year round, but more artists come out on weekends, in the evenings, and during big events like Mardi Gras.

    Arts Market of New Orleans

     Where: Palmer Park, S. Claiborne and S. Carrolton Avenues, Carrollton/Uptown

     When: Last Saturday of every month

     Hours: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.

     The Arts Market New Orleans is the Arts Council’s free, open-air, family-friendly monthly marketplace that features between 80 and 130 artists, both local and from all over the Gulf Coast. You’ll find affordable paintings, photography, ceramics, and glasswork, plus everything from jewelry to soap. Food vendors and live music are also featured.

    French Market

     Where: 700-1010 Decatur Street, French Quarter

     When: Open daily

     Hours: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.               

     This sprawling open-air mall was founded in 1791, which makes it the oldest continually operating public market in the country. You can spend hours strolling through this six-block market reminiscent of traditional European markets, from the daily flea market at the end of Esplanade Avenue, through the farmers market stalls, and all the down to Cafe du Monde on Decatur Street. Vendors offer their creations in all price ranges. Depending on the time of year you visit the French Market, you might walk into a festival taking place, and there’s a good chance you’ll be hearing live music on any given day.

    Freret Market

     Where: Freret and Napoleon Streets, Freret/Uptown

     When: First Saturday of the month except for July and August, with two markets in December

     Hours: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

     Freret Market was born in 2007 as part of the revitalization effort of the commercial corridor of Freret Street and has been impressively successful since. This open-air market combines the elements of art, food and flea markets, and features dozens of 90 vendors offering everything from crepes to dog adoptions. The market also features special events, local restaurant and catering business pop-ups and food carts, and live music. Freret Street kicks it up with an annual festival on the first Saturday of April, with many participating vendors who are also the market regulars.

    Palace Market Frenchmen

    Where: 619 Frenchmen Street, Marigny

     When:  Open daily

     Hours: Sunday – Wednesday 7 p.m. – midnight; Thursday – Saturday 7 p.m. – 1 a.m.

    This open-air night market gets a lot of foot traffic thanks to its prime location on the historic Frenchmen Street in the Marigny, just steps from the French Quarter. It features a diverse rotating collection of over 80 local illustrators, painters, jewelers, sculptors, and more. If you want to bring home some handmade New Orleans-themed art, this is the place to get it.

    Piety Market in Exile

    Where: New Orleans Healing Center, 2372 St. Claude Avenue, Bywater

    When: Second Saturday every month, with additional holiday markets throughout the year

    Hours: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. 

    After a five-year stint at the Old Ironworks on Piety Street in the Bywater, Piety Market has found a new home at the New Orleans Healing Center, which is located across the street from St. Roch Market in the lively St. Claude Avenue corridor. This bustling market is a must for local art, craft, vintage and flea market merch, and it also features live acoustic music and pop-up food.

    SecondLine Arts & Antiques

     Where: 1209 Decatur Street, French Quarter

     When: Thursday – Sunday

     Hours: Thursday – Sunday 5:30 p.m. – midnight; Friday – Sunday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m.

     Located on a busy block of Decatur Street not far from the French Market in the French Quarter, SecondLine Arts & Antiques gets a lot of foot traffic in its expansive indoor and outdoor spaces. The inside is crammed with both the funky, junkyard-type salvaged pieces of ironwork, signs and windows, and the more serious antiques. Right outside, the art and flea market is filled with furniture and tons of local art, all priced to move quickly.

    Zele NOLA

     Where: 2841 Magazine Street, Garden District

     When: Open daily

     Hours: Monday – Saturday 10:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Sunday noon – 5 p.m.

     Located on Magazine Street between 7th and 8th streets, this permanent indoor market features more than 100 shops under one roof. There you’ll find locally made art, clothing, crafts, home decor, and jewelry you can take home. The eclectic inventory is mostly handmade, and maintains the green theme by featuring recycled and repurposed items.

  4. Our Neighborhood — Most Popular Attractions Near the Alder Hotel

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    There’s plenty to explore around the Alder Hotel, even on foot. Mostly, this area of the city is heavily residential, with the late-19th century houses and small commercial properties drowning in lush greenery. The grand mansions under the canopies of live oaks of St. Charles Avenue are a few blocks away, and so is the shopping and dining strip of Magazine Street.

    One of the main attractions in the neighborhood is Freret Street, named after an antebellum New Orleans mayor. The stately mansions mix with the historic shotguns, surrounding the thriving eight-block corridor of Freret Street between Napoleon and Jefferson avenues. Due to the robust recovery and development efforts led by the locally-owned small businesses, developers, and the city administration, the street got an injection of much needed business and renovation and is showing no signs of slowing down.

    The neighborhood has its own monthly market and an annual festival, both held along Freret Street’s commercial strip. It even has its own Carnival krewe, Krewe of Freret, which parades during Mardi Gras and hosts a summer stroll.

    Just walking down the Freret Street corridor will bring you to the top-notch (and some of the most diverse) shopping and entertainment destinations. Of course, there’s plenty to eat and drink there as well. In the morning, hit up the dim and cozy Mojo Coffee House or the Rook Cafe for vegan pastries and locally roasted coffee.

    Need something more substantial first thing in the morning? The fun, upbeat Slim Goodies Diner on Magazine Street won’t steer you wrong with its inventively named slammers (different kinds of scrambles, from meaty to vegan, served with hash browns). Another inexpensive option is the Camellia Grill, a legendary Carrollton Avenue diner that’s been serving hearty omelets and pecan pie since 1946. There will probably be a line, but it moves quickly, and you can get breakfast all day.

    For lunch, try alligator sausage at the affordable Dat Dog, or have a craft cocktail at Cure and a glass of award-winning wine at Bar Frances come happy hour. Catfish is the star of the menu of the Louisiana-meets-the-Delta High Hat Cafe, and the recently revamped gastropub Freret Beer Room focuses on pairing craft beer with modern American cuisine (sandwiches, salads, cheese, and charcuterie boards).

    Cuban, Mexican and Central American fare like fish tacos and fried yucca plus excellent margaritas have earned Sarita’s Grill a loyal local following; and check out Mint Modern Vietnamese Bistro & Bar for several varieties of pho, banh mi, or a kimchi burger.

    The very photogenic St. Charles Avenue is probably best seen out of its historic streetcar, which you can ride for all of $1.25 from the CBD/downtown all the way upriver (exact change required, or get passes online). The street has retained a good number of historically significant 19th-century mansions, and you’ll find a lot of them in the Garden District section of Uptown.

    St. Charles Avenue hosts one of the best collections of historic houses in the South, including the “Wedding Cake House” (5807 St. Charles Ave.), the 1896 Colonial Revival home with lots of Victorian splendor to offer; the “Anthemion” (4631 St. Charles Ave.), which used to house the Japanese consulate; the “Smith House” (4534 St. Charles Ave.), built in 1906 for the president of the New Orleans Cotton Exchange, William Smith; the “Elms Mansion” (3029 St. Charles Ave.), a 1869 architectural wonder; and the “Diocesan” (2265 St. Charles Ave.), designed and built by the prominent local architect James Gallier.

    Another St. Charles Avenue gem that deserves a mention is the Milton H. Latter Memorial Library, a restored neo-Italianate limestone mansion built in 1907 for a wealthy merchant, Mark Isaacs. Inside, you’ll find the original ceiling frescoes and murals, and the well-preserved formal rooms on the first two floors.

    Heading into Carrolton and toward the Mississippi River, the imposing facades and sprawling balconies become generously mixed with the more modest but still well-preserved shotguns and thriving local businesses, including some of the best bars and restaurants in the city.

    Of course, don’t miss the magnificent Audubon Park that contains the Audubon Zoo and faces the historic campuses of Tulane and Loyola. Both boast an architectural mix of styles of the 19th century and modern, with the backdrop of large live oaks.

    Just like Freret Street’s revitalized strip, the 13 blocks of Magazine Street are meant to be walked. It’s the main commercial artery that the Garden District and Uptown share, and it’s crammed with restaurants, bars, sidewalk cafes, and dozens of retail stores where you can buy local art, antiques, vintage clothing, funky costumes, and more. Get some locally made New Orleans-centric gear at Dirty Coast or Fleurty Girl, or satisfy your costuming and vintage needs at Funky Monkey and Miss Claudia’s Vintage Clothing & Costumes.

    If you’d like a dozen raw oysters with your martini, head to the iconic Pascal Manale, where oysters are shucked right in front of you and the happy hour is a decades-long tradition. For live music, the iconic Tipitina’s and the Maple Leaf Bar cannot be beat, both a short ride away. There’s also something going on at Gasa Gasa, be it a movie screening, live music, or a krewe party.

    Finally, no Uptown architectural tour is complete without hitting the above-ground Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 on Washington Avenue, in the heart of the Garden District. It’s the oldest of the seven city-operated cemeteries in New Orleans, with some interesting society tombs (the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, Home For Destitute Orphan Boys among them) and over a thousand family tombs. The iconic cemetery has served as a popular backdrop for many music videos and movies over the years (Double JeopardyDracula, etc.).

    And right across the street is the incomparable Commander’s Palace (elevated Creole fare and a 25-cent martini lunch special!), a slice of classic New Orleans, not to be missed.

    Happy exploring near the Alder Hotel!

  5. Shopping Near Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans

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    Shopping Near Alder Hotel Uptown

    What sets a unique boutique apart from the rest of the big-box stores and chains? It’s simple: a strong point of view. Fortunately, New Orleans is home to a diverse group of bold, creative personalities, and while many of them find their niches in music, food or art, some express themselves by curating shops like none you’ve ever seen.

    Fortunately, Alder Hotel is just a short car ride (about a mile) from Magazine Street’s collection of shops. Nearby, bustling Freret Street is worth a visit as well. If you’re looking for the best places for shopping near Alder Hotel Uptown, check out these boutiques (arranged in chronological order) and find an excuse to leave with a fantastic, wearable souvenir — for a loved one or yourself.

    Ashley Longshore

    4537 Magazine St.

    Join pop artist Ashley Longshore‘s legions of fans, which include 278,000-plus Instagram followers and clients like Blake Lively and Cher, when you visit her Uptown studio gallery. Longshore playfully skewers trophy wives, excess, designer labels, and celebrity in her work: butterfly-bedecked silhouettes of women, champagne bottles, renditions of media personalities like Anna Wintour, and sassy phrases. All in all, Longshore’s large-scale acrylic paintings mirror her personality: glittery, hilarious and larger than life.

    Babe

    5007 Freret St.

    Babe is one of very few retailers to open on the revitalized Freret Street corridor, which boasts a wealth of bars, restaurants, and venues. While the nightlife is sparkling on the commercial stretch, the daytime shopping opportunities at this contemporary casual women’s boutique also are not to be missed. Find the perfect romper, chambray off-the-shoulder frock or statement jumpsuit at this bright and airy boutique (then wear it out on the town that night).

    Bambi DeVille’s Vintage Clothing 

    1925 Sophie Wright Place

    Bambi DeVille’s second location Uptown is a jewel box of a boutique and a welcome addition to her French Quarter original outpost (with better parking). The vast collection spans the Edwardian and Victorian eras, extending to the artfully beaded gowns, birdcage veils, furs, Japanese kimonos, Bakelite accessories, crocheted cover-ups, and sherbet-hued 1950s prom dresses. Notably, the boutique also has men’s and children’s vintage clothing. Everything is curated to the tee, kept in pristine condition and organized by era. The owner has been collecting museum-quality vintage pieces for decades and is a treasure trove of fashion knowledge.

    Buffalo Exchange 

    4119 Magazine St.

    A trendy nationwide chain that buys, sells and trades vintage and used clothing and accessories for men and women, Buffalo Exchange is a reliable stop for the gear ranging from designer evening dresses to basics to funky accessories. Located on a bustling stretch of Magazine Street and surrounded by boutiques and restaurants, Buffalo Exchange is popular among the locals and visitors alike. Thanks to its affordability and proximity to the Loyola and Tulane campuses, it’s also frequented by college students.

    Century Girl

    2023 Magazine St.

    This elegant vintage boutique showcases a carefully curated selection of rare and gorgeous vintage pieces spanning the decades including Jazz Age, many of them designer (think vintage Chanel earrings, Gatsby-esque rhinestone headbands, and bridal romantic lingerie of yesteryear). Everything is in pristine condition and impeccably presented.

    Dirty Coast

    1320 and 5631 Magazine St. 

    Dirty Coast is a New Orleans based T-shirt company that’s been around since 2004, outfitting the locals and the visitors alike in the NOLA-centric tees, hoodies and tanks, and coining the ubiquitous phrase “Be a New Orleanian Wherever You Are.” Besides T-shirts Dirty Coast is packed to the gills with coasters, bumper stickers, home goods, merch for kids, and lots and lots of all things Who Dat and Mardi Gras. In addition to its two Magazine Street locations the company has an outpost in the French Quarter (713 Royal St.) and at the airport.

    Fleurty Girl

    3117 Magazine St.

    A successful vision of New Orleans-native Lauren Leblanc Haydel, Fleurty Girl was founded in 2009 and has since expanded to more locations in Louisiana, including one Uptown, and the latest addition at the new North Terminal at Louis Armstrong International Airport. The boutique T-shirt chain sells New Orleans-inspired apparel, accessories, home decor, and gifts. Fleurty Girl’s specialties are Who Dat shirts and “Shirts With Y’atitude” for men, women, kids, and even dogs — very New Orleans pride.

    Funky Monkey

     3127 Magazine St.

     The affordable, quirky and locally owned Funky Monkey mixes new, used and vintage clothing and accessories for both men and women with costumes, trendy basics, and contemporary indie labels. Come Halloween or Mardi Gras this is your destination for seasonal gear like vintage ballgowns and costume jewelry.

    Hemline

    3310 Magazine St.

    This is the second outpost of the popular French Quarter boutique. Owner Brigitte Holthausen built her style empire starting in New Orleans in the early 90s, eventually ending up with 28 locations throughout the South. Hemline excels at expertly curating a rotating collection of covetable fashion from premium brands, luxe to casual, including high-quality denim, cocktail dresses, and shoes and accessories.

    Jeantherapy

    5505 Magazine St. and 2022 Magazine St.

    This hip local chain is well stocked with enviable designer denim, plus things like graphic tees (JTees) for men, women, and kids. Think lots and lots of football-fan gear to represent your Saints/LSU pride. Jeantherapy has three locations in metro New Orleans, at the Lakeside Mall and two Uptown.

    Magazine Antique Mall

    3017 Magazine St.

    This sprawling indoor haven for the antique and vintage shoppers is brimming with estate jewelry, vintage clothing, 70s tchotchkes, antique furniture, collectibles, and anything else you can dig out. It’s a 6,500 sq. ft. trifecta of a walk down the memory lane, a bargain hunt, and a trip down the rabbit hole, all under one roof.

    Magpie

    4529 Magazine St.

    Magpie is an absolute treasure trove of unique vintage items, from sparkling 1920s art deco engagement rings to hallucinogenically colorful 1960s caftans. Prices are surprisingly affordable for vintage and antique items in such good condition, and the cozy, wood-floored shop is as inviting as a friend’s living room. Out-of-towners who fall in love with Magpie can shop the store’s Etsy page once they return home — a visit to this boutique is only the beginning of a beautiful relationship.

    Miss Claudia’s Vintage Clothing & Costumes

     4204 Magazine St.

     Small but mighty, Miss Claudia’s is a goldmine filled with majorette boots, funky vintage costumes, wigs, dazzling accessories, and other everyday and festive essentials for your one-of-a-kind Halloween or Mardi Gras outfit.

    Perlis

    6070 Magazine St.

    Perlis has been going strong since 1939 as a family-run clothier in Southern Louisiana, now with four locations including Baton Rouge and at the Jax Brewery in the French Quarter. If you have a hankering for southern-style clothing Perlis has you covered with designer brands and made-to-measure items. The company caters heavily to men, but you’ll also find lots of clothing for women and kids, plus Louisiana-themed gifts. One of the best-known collections by Perlis features a crawfish logo — where you’ll find the famous mudbug gracing shorts, shirts, polos, socks, wallets — very Louisiana.

    United Apparel Liquidators (UAL)

    3306 Magazine St.

    This small Southern chain has two locations in New Orleans (the other one is on Chartres St. in the French Quarter), offering up to 90% off on past-season and overstock items obtained directly from high-end boutiques and department stores. They also work directly with designers to purchase their samples and overruns, so this is a great shop for one-of-a-kind piece from designer brands at a fraction of the original price.

    Victoria Boutique

    4858 Magazine St.

    Upscale, understated and home to luxury designer brands, Victoria Boutique is the retail equivalent of Posh Spice. It’s the destination for New Orleans’ well-heeled crowd, boasting exclusive labels like Maliparmi, Majestic, Gary Graham, and M. & Kyoko. Shop at this gorgeous, sprawling boutique and you just may brush shoulders with a former Carnival queen. (You’ll feel like royalty.)

  6. Shopping the Freret Market

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    Freret Street Market

    In a city that’s decidedly not lacking in the art and farm markets, merch pop-ups, and food trucks, Freret Market stands out for its sheer size and the fact that it combines all those components — art, flea, food/farm, and live music. This open-air market is located at Freret Street and Napoleon Avenue and is held on the first Saturday of every month (except June-August) from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

    The Freret Market was started in September 2007 to revitalize the Freret business corridor. Since then, it’s grown to become a popular destination with special events and healthy attendance numbers. Besides the weekly food, art and flea vendors, the market regularly hosts local restaurant and catering business pop-ups and food carts. There are usually about 80-90 vendors total, plus live music, an area for kids; and pet adoptions available from Zeus Place, the market’s fellow Freret Street neighbor.

    Today’s Freret Market is a vital part of the renaissance that Freret Street has been experiencing. The eight blocks stretching from Downtown to Uptown New Orleans parallel to St. Charles Avenue are known as a popular destination for food, shopping, and entertainment. The street hosts many restaurants, specialty shops, art galleries, bars, coffee shops, and more. It’s also home of the annual Freret Street Festival, held on the first Saturday in April. The festival has been growing since the mid-1990s, with about 200 vendors participating last year.

    The weekly sampling of food vendors at the Freret Market includes Iacovone Kitchen with fresh, chef-driven menu of panini, Gulf shrimp and rice bowls, Soulful Solutions NOLA (healthy versions of New Orleans’ soul food faves), and The Creole Caveman (allergy-friendly, gluten-free Creole-inspired fare with many vegan offerings). You can also expect to see some of the local catering businesses and food trucks every week, such as La Cocinita, a gem of a food truck that dishes out the Venezuelan-inspired Latin American street fare, and Any O’Cajun, which serves Southern favorites like corn-and-crab bisque. While at the market, make sure you stop by the Gachi stall, to check out the artisan-crafted tea sustainably sourced from small farms and co-ops.

    There are many opportunities to indulge your sweet tooth (check out Keyala’s Pralines), get some locally made soap, candles, jerky, or pepper jelly. There are also plenty of art, flea and vintage vendors, farm stalls, and local merchants selling furniture, clothing, jewelry, and more.

    Freret Market is located near the University District, which contains the Tulane and Loyola campuses. The area is easy to navigate and get to from the French Quarter and other areas by car and public transportation. There’s off-street parking in the lot at the corner of Cadiz and Magnolia Streets, and plenty of street parking on adjacent streets.

    And, please note: The Alder Hotel offers free self-parking in the parking lot directly across the street. It’s relatively rare to find this amenity in New Orleans, so we hope you take advantage of it!

    Stay in touch and save on rates and more at the Alder Hotel by signing up for our email list at https://alderhotel.com/email-offers/. If you find a lower rate on your Alder Hotel rooms at the time of booking, call 1.888.626.5861 to let us know, and we will match that rate!

  7. Uptown New Orleans: A Family-Friendly Itinerary

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    While some other parts of the city may be more known for their late-night entertainment options, Uptown, with its child-friendly food scene, ease of navigation via streetcar, and vibrant, walkable commercial corridors like Magazine and Freret streets, offers a wide variety of things to do with kids. There are great bookstores, parks and playgrounds, tours, cafes, restaurants, museums, and shops that are perfectly suitable for the under-18 crowd.

    Attractions

    St. Charles AvenueMagazine and Freret streets are packed with shopping destinations, art galleries, and restaurants (many of which have spacious outdoor or balcony seating). Freret Street is also home to a market, held on the first Saturday of every month except June-August, and a festival, held in early April. Both events feature live music and plenty of food vendors. Magazine and Freret Streets are easy to walk, and you can take a streetcar along St. Charles Avenue for a mere $1.25.

    The majestic, oak tree-lined St. Charles Avenue is one of the most beautiful streets in the country, if not the world, with blocks upon blocks of spectacular mansions and landscaped gardens. The ride on the historic St. Charles Avenue line streetcar is high on top of the many visitors’ bucket list because it’s the oldest continuously operating streetcar line in the world (since 1835), and because it affords a very easy and pleasant way to see the Garden District and Uptown areas.

    To take in all the beauty of the Italianate, Victorian and Greek Revival architecture of Uptown, you can just walk around. Many of the original mid-19th century mansions have been immaculately preserved and are surrounded by the impressive gardens. Both self-guided and guided tours are available daily in the Garden District and Uptown — on foot or by bus or car (free for kids under 6). Kids and adults alike might also like visiting Lafayette Cemetery No. 1, one of the oldest cemeteries in the city, located in the heart of the Garden District, between Washington, Sixth, Prytania, and Coliseum streets.

    Another must-stop, especially if you have kids in tow, is the magnificent Audubon Park. Located in the historic district of Uptown near the picturesque campuses of Tulane and Loyola universities, Audubon Park is perfect for a stroll or a picnic (bring some bread to feed the ducks). Lined with hundreds of ancient live oaks, it features a 1.8-mile jogging path, playgrounds, picnic shelters, a lagoon, recreation areas, and a zoo.

    The Audubon Zoo is one of the top zoos in the country, full of lush vegetation and exotic animal exhibits. The younger kids may like riding the zoo’s Swamp train, and older kids can try the Safari Simulator ride. The Zoo features rare white alligators, a komodo dragon, sea lion shows, a carousel, and the award-winning Louisiana Swamp and Jaguar Jungle natural habitat areas. During the warmer months, you may want to bring your bathing suits and splash in the Zoo’s mini water park, the Cool Zoo.

    Few things are more family-friendly than catching a movie, and the classic Prytania Theatre is a century-old movie theater, and the only single-screen one left in Louisiana. Inside, you’ll find plush red seats and a tiny coffee stand with excellent gelato and espresso for the adults plus kid-friendly snacks.

    Eating and Drinking

    Uptown is packed with restaurants that feature kid-friendly menus and/or menus catering to children specifically. These are but a few highlights, starting with St. James Cheese Company, home of the $5 Mini Moo sandwich. Targeting the “smaller cheese lovers,” it’s made with Hook’s Cheddar cheese grilled on wheat bread and comes with chips and fruit. The kids will probably also love the shop’s cheese and charcuterie boards, which change daily and come with bread and an assortment of condiments.

    We also recommend The Company Burger on Freret and Cadiz streets for its solid menu of delicious burgers, fries and milkshakes; and the famous Camellia Grill diner with an extensive breakfast menu. The affordable Dat Dog at its Freret Street location dishes out a wide variety of meat, fish, vegan and veggie hot dogs, sausages, and other kid-friendly comfort food like burgers and chicken. Your kids will be happy to know that the dogs and the sausages come with a choice of more than 30 toppings.

    For local comfort food with homestyle Creole and Cajun fare like po-boys and jambalaya, try Joey K’s on Magazine Street. The menu is already kid-friendly, but there’s also a kids’ menu — with grilled cheese, fried shrimp and catfish, and more. The seafood-focused Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar has great views of St. Charles Avenue, an oyster bar, and a kids’ menu that goes beyond chicken tenders, with items like the grilled shrimp and grilled chicken pasta alfredo.

    For a sweet treat, check out Piccola Gelateria. In addition to small-batch, house-made gelato and sorbetto in over a dozen flavors, this classic Italian-style gelato shop offers crepes (savory with meat, sweet with Nutella, and vegetarian). The whole family will also love the award-winning Gracious Bakery + Cafe (with two locations Uptown). All desserts and baked goods are top-notch, and there are house-cured salmon bagels and breakfast sandwiches. 

    DISTRICT. Donuts. Sliders. Brew. on Magazine and Jackson streets also has a sophisticated coffee menu plus donuts and sliders. The tiny District: Donut & Coffee Bar located on the corner of Arabella and Magazine streets offers a smaller menu, though still packed with coffee and espresso options, plus kolaches, biscuits, donuts, and sandwiches.

    We hope you enjoy some family time exploring all that the area around the Alder Hotel has to offer!

    Stay in touch and save on rates and more at the Alder Hotel by signing up for our email list at https://alderhotel.com/email-offers/. If you find a lower rate on your Alder Hotel room at the time of booking, call 1.888.626.5861, and we will match that rate, too.

    other parts of the city may be more known for their late-night entertainment options, Uptown, with its child-friendly food scene, ease of navigation via streetcar, and vibrant, walkable commercial corridors like Magazine and Freret streets, offers a wide variety of things to do with kids. There are great bookstores, parks and playgrounds, tours, cafes, restaurants, museums, and shops that are perfectly suitable for the under-18 crowd.

    Attractions

    St. Charles Avenue, Magazine and Freret streets are packed with shopping destinations, art galleries, and restaurants (many of which have spacious outdoor or balcony seating). Freret Street is also home to a market, held on the first Saturday of every month from noon till 4 p.m. The event features live music and plenty of food vendors. Magazine and Freret Streets are easy to walk, and you can take a streetcar all the way along St. Charles Avenue for a mere $1.25.

    The majestic, oak tree-lined St. Charles Avenue is one of the most beautiful streets in the country, if not the world, with blocks upon blocks of spectacular mansions and landscaped gardens. The ride on the historic St. Charles Avenue line streetcar is high on top of the many visitors’ bucket list because it’s the oldest continuously operating streetcar line in the world (since 1835), and because it affords a very easy and pleasant way to see the Garden District and Uptown areas.

    To take in all the beauty of the Italianate, Victorian and Greek Revival architecture of Uptown, you can take your kids on a free walking tour. Many of the original mid-19th century mansions have been immaculately preserved and are surrounded by the impressive gardens. Both self-guided and guided tours are available daily in the Garden District and Uptown — on foot or by bus or car (free for kids under 6). Kids and adults alike might also like visiting Lafayette Cemetery No. 1, one of the oldest cemeteries in the city, located in the heart of the Garden District, between Washington, Sixth, Prytania, and Coliseum streets.

    Another must-stop, especially if you have kids in tow, is the magnificent Audubon Park. Located in the historic district of Uptown near the picturesque campuses of Tulane and Loyola universities, Audubon Park is perfect for a stroll or a picnic (bring some bread to feed the ducks). Lined with hundreds of ancient live oaks, it features a 1.8-mile jogging path, playgrounds, picnic shelters, a lagoon, recreation areas, and a zoo.

    The Audubon Zoo is one of the top zoos in the country, full of lush vegetation and exotic animal exhibits. The younger kids may like riding the zoo’s Swamp train, and older kids can try the Safari Simulator ride. The Zoo features rare white alligators, a komodo dragon, sea lion shows, a carousel, and the award-winning Louisiana Swamp and Jaguar Jungle natural habitat areas. During the warmer months, you may want to bring your bathing suits and splash in the Zoo’s mini water park, the Cool Zoo. Tickets are $22.95 for adults and $17.95 for kids ages 2-12 (Cool Zoo is $12 extra).

    Another remarkable destination for the kids is the Louisiana Children’s Museum, a 30,000 sq. ft. space of over 100 interactive exhibits that include a climbing wall, art studio, and mock cafe. Tiny tots have they own play area. And last but not least, the Maple Street Book Shop is a treasure trove of all things Louisiana and offers free storytime for kids on Saturday mornings.

    Eating and Drinking

    Uptown is packed with restaurants that feature kid-friendly menus and/or menus catering to children specifically. These are but a few highlights, starting with St. James Cheese Company, home of the $5 Mini Moo sandwich. Targeting the “smaller cheese lovers,” it’s made Hook’s Cheddar cheese grilled on wheat bread, and comes with chips and fruit. The kids will probably also love the shop’s cheese and charcuterie boards, which change daily and come with bread and an assortment of condiments (prices range from $12.50 for three items to $30 for 10).

    We also recommend The Company Burger on Freret and Cadiz streets for its solid menu of delicious burgers, fries and milkshakes; and the famous Camellia Grill diner with an extensive breakfast menu. The affordable Dat Dog at its Freret Street location dishes out a wide variety of meat, fish, vegan and veggie hot dogs, sausages, and other kid-friendly comfort food like burgers and chicken. Your kids will be happy to know that the dogs and the sausages come with a choice of more than 30 toppings.

    For local comfort food with homestyle Creole and Cajun fare like po-boys and jambalaya, try Joey K’s on Magazine Street. The menu is already kid-friendly, but there’s also a kids’ menu — with grilled cheese, fried shrimp and catfish, and more. The seafood-focused Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar has great views of St. Charles Avenue, an oyster bar, and a kids’ menu that goes beyond chicken tenders, with items like the grilled shrimp and grilled chicken pasta alfredo.

    For a sweet treat, Sucre on Magazine Street cannot be beat for its Parisian patisserie feel and dozens of amazing confections. The whole family will enjoy the cakes and the macaroons, and there is a serious beverage menu for the adults to enjoy. DISTRICT. Donuts. Sliders. Brew. on Magazine and Jackson streets also has a sophisticated coffee menu plus donuts and sliders. The tiny District: Donut & Coffee Bar location on the corner of Arabella and Magazine streets offers a smaller menu, though still packed with coffee and espresso options, plus kolaches, biscuits, donuts, and sandwiches.

  8. Fun with Fido in Uptown New Orleans

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    pet friendly new orleans hotel alder hotel uptown new orleans

    New Orleans is a dog city, and there’s no reason to leave your four-legged family member at home when you travel to New Orleans, or at a hotel while you’re here. Here’s a list of places Uptown where you and your dog will always be welcome, plus a big dog run located elsewhere, but it’s easy to get to from Uptown (and your dog will thank you).

    We Are a Pet-Friendly Hotel

    We welcome dogs and cats at the Alder Hotel and look forward to hosting you and your pets when you stay in Uptown New Orleans. You can review our pet policy here. If you are traveling with large dogs (over 50 pounds) or need supervision for your dog while you sightsee, we recommend Zeus’ Place (4601 Freret St.).

    Parks and Dog Runs

    The Wisner Dog Run, located inside the free, city-run Wisner Playground at 4876 Laurel Street, is fenced off, so you can let your dog play off-leash with other well-socialized dogs. It’s not huge, at only 8,500 square feet, but the off-leash areas are not easy to come by in any city, and this one is part of a little urban park, so it also comes with access to benches, water fountains, and some shade — all in the middle of a busy Uptown area.

    Another option is to hit the urban oasis of the historic Audubon Park. You and your dog can enjoy the lagoons, a tranquil 1.8-mile jogging path, picnic shelters under the live oaks, and much more. The Riverview portion of the park, also known as The Fly, is located behind the Audubon Zoo and along the Mississippi River. It’s a popular spot to have a barbeque or a crawfish boil, toss a frisbee, or simply sit by the river and watch the sun go down. The Fly is open till 9 p.m. and is equipped with picnic areas, ample parking spaces, and public restrooms.

    The so-called “Dog Levee” is an informal park near the corner of Leake Avenue and Magazine Street (100-7198 Magazine Street). It has a paved walking path but is not fenced off. If your dog loves to swim and is not a flight risk when off-leash this is a good place to take a dip.

    The last recommended place on the list is not located Uptown, but it’s not far, worth the trip, and easy to get to. The largest off-leash dog run in New Orleans, NOLA City Bark, is located in the sprawling City Park that extends from Mid-City into Lakeview. This fenced-off dog park occupies a 4.6-acre plot of land and has separate play areas for small and big dogs. It also has hills and water fountains for the dogs to enjoy, plus water play area and doggie pools. For humans, there are also water fountains, shade pavilions, restrooms, and walking paths.

    Please note that NOLA City Bark is gated and you’ll need a key card/permit to enter. Temporary permits for visitors are available at the dog park office (1 Palm Drive). This is to ensure that all dogs that use the park have been properly vaccinated, and spayed or neutered.

    Dog-Friendly Bars and Restaurants

    There are plenty of dog-friendly restaurants and bars Uptown and elsewhere in the city. If there’s outdoor seating, like a patio or sidewalk tables, chances are all well-behaved dogs will be welcome. Uptown, check out the blocks-long commercial corridors of Magazine and Freret streets in particular, filled with sidewalk cafes and restaurants with outdoor seating.

    These few places stand out, however, as especially well-suited for your canine friends to visit.

    Dat Dog‘s both Uptown locations (3336 Magazine Street near Louisiana Avenue and 5030 Freret Street near Soniat Street) have dog-friendly outdoor seating. The Magazine Street location is great for people-watching, and both locations have popular happy hours and lots of craft beer. The Magazine Street location also hosts an art market in the outdoor area.

    Another popular Magazine Street establishment, the Bulldog Uptown, located on the corner of Magazine and Pleasant Streets in the heart of the Garden District, features a huge, dog-friendly patio. There’s fresh water put out daily for all furry friends.

    The lovely patios at St. James Cheese Company (the Uptown location at 5004 Prytania Street) and the Rusty Nail (1100 Constance Street, on the corner of Constance and John Churchill Chase, where the Warehouse District ends and the Lower Garden begins) are also popular among the dog lovers. What’s more enjoyable than having a leisurely drink on a spacious patio, surrounded by lush greenery, while your dog lounges at your feet?

    Want to stay in touch and save on rates at the Alder Hotel? Sign up for our email list at https://alderhotel.com/email-offers/! And if you find a lower rate on your Alder Hotel rooms at the time of booking, call 1.888.626.5861 to let us know, and we will match that rate.

  9. Coffee, Brunch, Lunch, and Co-Working Near the Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans

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    Here at the Alder Hotel, We know you don’t want to miss out on all the great food New Orleans has to offer. Fortunately, plenty of outstanding breakfast, brunch, and just-coffee options are just a short walk from our doorstep. From gluttonous to gluten-free, there’s an option to suit every palate. Here are our favorite picks, plus a few top recommendations on the best spots to co-work while you’re in town.

    Coffee

    Gracious Bakery + Cafe (4930 Prytania Street)

    The award-winning Gracious Bakery + Cafe has another location Uptown, at 2854 St. Charles Avenue, on the corner of 6th Street in the Garden District. All baked goods and breakfast sandwiches are top-notch, and there are house-made granola and house-cured salmon bagels.

    French Truck Coffee (4536 Dryades Street)

    Sandwiches, toast, pastries, and the best iced cold-drip coffee New Orleans has to offer, all served in a high-ceilinged, Edison bulb-hung space — that’s what you’ll find at French Truck Coffee. There’s no better way to while away a morning, iced latte in hand.

    Humble Bagel (4716 Freret Street)

    Humble Bagel’s creations are made in-house daily, from scratch, with just five ingredients, and in small batches (the proprietors are big on minimizing food waste and using locally sourced ingredients when possible). The place is open till 1 p.m. daily, or until they sell out. The menu is kept simple — bagels, cream cheese, and breakfast combos like eggs, bacon, and lox — and it’s worth getting up early for.

    La Boulangerie (4600 Magazine Street)

    The tarts, scones, quiches, and muffins at this French bakery and cafe are almost too pretty to eat, and all menu items are hand-prepared according to traditional recipes. Sit at a sidewalk table with an almond croissant and a cafe au lait and feel like you’ve been transported to Paris.

    Mojo Coffee House (4700 Freret Street)

    Stacks of local alt-weeklies? Check. College radio on the speakers? Check. Free wi-fi and plenty of table space for settling in and work for the long haul without receiving dirty looks from a barista? Check. Chalkboard menu? Check. This dim, cozy coffee house features all the coffee shop staples, plus its own locally roasted beans. Try the Mojo blend in a cup or take home a bag of beans as a souvenir. Sandwiches and pastries round out the menu. For those mornings when you just need caffeine and a quick bite, nothing beats Mojo.

    Raw Republic (4528 Magazine Street)

    Raw Republic’s cold-pressed, organic juices are a healthy way to kickstart your day. The bright, modern storefront offers coffee, smoothies, salads, cereal, and grab-and-go vegan fare, too. Though the storefront is tiny, a staircase leads to an upstairs room with balcony seating — perfect for people-watching while sipping your green juice.

    The Rook Cafe (4516 Freret Street)

    Rook, a quiet hangout popular with the locals, serves vegan pastries and locally roasted coffee. Free wi-fi and shelves lined with books and tabletop games are also a draw. The cozy coffee shop also hosts frequent gamers’ nights and pop-ups.

    Brunch

    Another Broken Egg Cafe (2917 Magazine Street)

    This is a popular brunch destination on the bustling commercial corridor of Magazine Street with pancakes, brunch specialties like crab cake Benedict and eggs with crawfish and Andouille, signature omelets, and specialty spiked cold brews and Bloody Marys served in mason jars.

    Bearcat Cafe (2521 Jena Street)

    While New Orleans is known for rich, decadent breakfasts like eggs Benedict (poached eggs, hollandaise and bacon layered over English muffins), not everyone wants heavy meals every day, even when on vacation. Maybe you’re looking for a break from indulgence, or maybe you adhere to a gluten-free, vegan lifestyle. Whatever your dietary requirements may be, you’ll find a delicious meal that satisfies them at Bearcat’s airy, industrial-chic space.

    The Camellia Grill (626 S. Carrollton Avenue)

    This legendary New Orleans diner has been serving hearty omelets and pecan pie since 1946. There will probably be a line, but it moves quickly, and you can get breakfast all day.

    Red Dog Diner (3122 Magazine Street)

    The Red Dog’s rustic decor will remind you of a farmhouse, and the menu is “refined comfort food” — an eclectic mix of Southern favorites and international influences (think gravlax and huevos rancheros; tasso shrimp and grits, and eggs Sardou). Brunch is served daily, and there’s even a breakfast happy hour on weekdays.

    Satsuma (1320 Magazine Street)

    Satsuma’s menu is full of locally sourced dishes like eggs-and-kale scramble and a braised pork sandwich, plus coffee and fresh-squeezed juices. It also has another location Uptown, at 7901 Maple Street.

    Slim Goodies Diner (3322 Magazine Street)

    A cash-only, inexpensive local hangout with Southern staples and plenty of local color. Some of the house specialties are the inventively named slammers (different kinds of scrambles, from meaty to vegan, served with hash browns). The Creole Slammer, for instance, comes with a biscuit and crawfish étouffée. There’s also a lovely patio.

    Surrey’s Uptown (4807 Magazine Street)

    Word to the wise: This BYOB  brunch destination often has long lines on Sunday mornings, so get there early. But even if you sleep in, a leisurely breakfast on the Surrey’s porch is more than worth the wait. Everyone’s tastes will be accommodated, from Louisiana cuisine fans (shrimp and grits, bananas Foster French toast) and vegans (tofu breakfast platter, organic juice) to breakfast purists (home fries with cheese).

    The Ruby Slipper Cafe (2802 Magazine Street)

    This locally owned mini-chain is a must-go for heaping Southern staples like eggs cochon, croque madame, and Creole reuben. It’s got its award-winning formula down with generous portions, killer cocktails, upbeat and quick service, and the downhome vibe. Even if there’s a wait, it will be worth it.

    Lunch

    Ancora (4508 Freret Street)

    Ancora’s pizza is made Neapolitan-style, using wood-burning ovens and without commercial yeast. Ancora makes its own starter, and the dough takes three days to prepare from start to finish, with the crust that is unique to New Orleans. Drinks include seasonal Italian sodas, craft cocktails, and wines from the Campania region of southern Italy. Ancora is located in a renovated building next to High Hat Cafe.

    Cure (4905 Freret Street)

    A popular destination for cocktail lovers, Cure is a stylish, upscale lounge located inside a renovated firehouse. There you can sip your Old-Fashioned surrounded by bottles of whiskey from around the world, including the hard-to-find, rare and reserve varieties. The well-reviewed menu offers a rotation of frequently changing cocktails made by seasoned mixologists along with small plates and bar snacks. This would have to be lunch on a later side, as Cure opens at 3 p.m. on weekends.

    Dat Dog (5030 Freret Street; 3336 Magazine Street)

    Dat Dog’s both Uptown locations have dog-friendly outdoor seating, great for people-watching too. At its Freret Street location, the affordable Dat Dog dishes out a wide variety of meat, fish, vegan and veggie hot dogs, sausages, and other kid-friendly comfort food like burgers and chicken. The dogs and the sausages come with a choice of more than 30 toppings.

    High Hat Cafe (4500 Freret Street)

    This casual neighborhood eatery on the corner of Freret and Jena streets specializes in the Mississippi Delta and Louisiana staples like catfish, Gulf seafood, and slow-roasted pork served along with a long cocktail menu. Pimento cheese is prominently featured in the house burger, specialty fries, and even deviled eggs. How about a Southern feast of catfish with hushpuppies, braised greens, and black-eyed peas for brunch? Or try the Gumbo Ya-Ya with sweet potato salad. You’ll feel like you’re in an old-fashioned diner, only with a full bar. The tall glass windows offer a prime opportunity to people-watch, too.

    Mint Modern Vietnamese Bistro & Bar (5100 Freret Street)

    Mint’s streamlined menu is modern indeed, packed with specialty rolls, several varieties of pho, banh mi, and a kimchi burger. One of the unusual specialty cocktails is Fishy Surprise, which is made with whiskey, Drambuie, grapefruit juice, and fish sauce.

    Piccola Gelateria (4525 Freret Street)

    In addition to small-batch, house-made gelato and sorbetto in over a dozen flavors, this classic Italian-style gelato shop offers crepes (savory with meat, sweet with Nutella, and vegetarian). Piccola Gelateria sources local milk and cream, and sells its own, custom-blended, micro-roasted espresso. The place opens at noon, and could also serve well as a brunch destination.

    Sarita’s Grill (4520 Freret Street)

    Cuban, Mexican and Central American fare like fish tacos and fried yucca plus excellent margaritas have earned Sarita’s a loyal local following. The guacamole is made in-house, servings are generous, and queso dip is complimentary.

    The Company Burger (4600 Freret Street)

    We also recommend The Company Burger on Freret and Cadiz streets for its solid menu of delicious burgers, fries and milkshakes. The menu keeps it simple with the award-winning lamb, turkey, and beef burgers, plus sides, shakes, and cocktails. The house burger comes with a fried egg, two patties, and bacon. The “not burger” options are also kept simple: hot dogs, and grilled cheese and fried chicken sandwiches.

    Best Place to Co-Working Near the Alder Hotel

    There’s something to be said for exploring a new city while leaving your everyday life and responsibilities behind. But occasionally, circumstances dictate that you bring your work on the road. It’s not an ideal situation, but it’s reality for many travelers. The silver lining? At many co-working locations, you can accomplish your tasks while soaking up uniquely New Orleans experiences — and see a side of the city that’s hidden from most tourists. These co-working destinations are less than two miles from the Alder Hotel, and all offer free wi-fi or public computers, along with a little lagniappe of grand, historic settings. The coffee shops and cafes listed above are also a good bet if you want a good, strong cup of locally sourced coffee while you work.

    Howard-Tilton Memorial Library (Tulane University, 7001 Freret St.)

    The Tulane library offers all the perks of being a student, without the stressful final exams. Situated on Tulane University’s lush, live oak-filled campus, this six-story library is a haven of solitude, and it’s open to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily (after that hour, only library cardholders may enter the building). Visitor computers are available on the first floor of the Research Help Center, but wi-fi is limited to student use only. Head to the third-floor stacks if you’re seeking a quiet study area, or grab a cup of locally roasted coffee at PJ’s on the first floor.

    Latter Branch Public Library (5120 St. Charles Ave.)

    Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this gorgeous 1907 neo-Italianate mansion on St. Charles Avenue would be worth a visit even if it didn’t offer all the amenities of a public library. The limestone building was donated to the city of New Orleans in 1958, and its beauty has been preserved: think chandelier-hung, antiques-furnished reading rooms, Dutch ceiling murals and mahogany paneling. On the more technology-centered side, there’s printing, wi-fi (out-of-town visitors get a free one-hour pass with a valid I.D.), computers for public use, and an outdoor garden seating. It’s a way to be productive while experiencing a completely New Orleans setting.

    Propeller Incubator (4035 Washington Ave.)

    Looking for blazing-fast wi-fi, free coffee, printing, scanners, copy machines and a community of like-minded individuals? This 10,000-square-foot, industrial-chic space is the spot. Co-working desks can be rented by the day or month, or you can buy a 10-day punch card. And if you need to organize a presentation during your visit, there are projector-equipped conference rooms available to rent. Propeller is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with 24/7 access available for members.

    Stay in touch and save on rates and more at the Alder Hotel by signing up for our email list at https://alderhotel.com/email-offers/. If you find a lower rate on your Alder Hotel room at the time of booking, call 1.888.626.5861, and we will match that rate, too.

  10. Where to Get Breakfast Near the Alder Hotel Uptown

    Comments Off on Where to Get Breakfast Near the Alder Hotel Uptown

    Breakfast is the most important meal of the day… and that goes double when you’re vacationing in New Orleans. It offers both an opportunity to recover from the previous night and a chance to build a solid foundation for a busy day. And if you are not an early riser, and depending on how much time you have, breakfast can morph into a lingering brunch! Whether you’re looking to chow down on banana pancakes or sip a cold-pressed green juice, there’s a breakfast or brunch spot for you within a stone’s throw (or a short ride away) of your room at Alder Hotel Uptown.

    Another Broken Egg Cafe (2917 Magazine Street)

    This is a popular brunch destination on the bustling commercial corridor of Magazine Street with pancakes, brunch specialties like crab cake Benedict and eggs with crawfish and Andouille, signature omelets, and specialty spiked cold brews and Bloody Marys served in mason jars.

    Bearcat Cafe (2521 Jena Street)

    Less than a block off Freret Street and within walking distance of Ochsner Baptist Medical Center and the Tulane and Loyola University area, this full-service cafe offers lunch and breakfast plus sustainable coffee. The menu is mostly comfort food, divided into “Good Cat” and “Bad Cat” sections. The lighter fare is full of gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan options like vegan tofu scramble and house-made yogurt. The hearty “Bad Cat” offers items like traditional breakfast fare of the eggs-and-bacon variety, and Southern staples like shrimp and grits.

    French Truck Coffee (4536 Dryades Street)

    Sandwiches, toast, pastries, and the best iced cold-drip coffee New Orleans has to offer, all served in a high-ceilinged, Edison bulb-hung space — that’s what you’ll find at French Truck Coffee. There’s no better way to while away a morning, iced latte in hand.

    Gracious Bakery + Cafe (4930 Prytania Street)

    The award-winning Gracious Bakery + Cafe has another location Uptown, at 2854 St. Charles Avenue, on the corner of 6th Street in the Garden District. All baked goods and breakfast sandwiches are top notch, and there are house-made granola and house-cured salmon bagels.

    Humble Bagel (4716 Freret Street)

    Humble Bagel’s creations are made in-house daily, from scratch, with just five ingredients, and in small batches (the proprietors are big on minimizing food waste and using locally sourced ingredients when possible). The place is open till 1 p.m. daily, or until they sell out. The menu is kept simple — bagels, cream cheese, and breakfast combos like eggs, bacon, and lox — and it’s worth getting up early for.

    La Boulangerie (4600 Magazine Street)

    The tarts, scones, quiches, and muffins at this French bakery and cafe are almost too pretty to eat, and all menu items are hand-prepared according to traditional recipes. Sit at a sidewalk table with an almond croissant and a cafe au lait and feel like you’ve been transported to Paris.

    Mojo Coffee House (4700 Freret St.)

    Looking for a cozy, welcoming hangout where you can grab small-batch roasted coffee, a vegan muffin, and connect to wi-fi? Mojo Coffee House is the spot. You won’t find full kitchen service at this laid-back coffee house (the counter-service destination is more of a pastry-and-sandwich variety), but for those mornings when you just need caffeine and a quick bite, nothing beats Mojo.

    Piccola Gelateria (4525 Freret Street)

    In addition to small-batch, house-made gelato and sorbetto in about 18 flavors, this classic Italian-style gelato shop offers crepes (savory with meat, sweet with Nutella, and vegetarian). Piccola Gelateria sources local milk and cream, and sells its own, custom-blended, micro-roasted espresso. The place opens at noon, and could serve well as a brunch destination.

    Raw Republic (4528 Magazine Street)

    Raw Republic’s cold-pressed, organic juices are a healthy way to kickstart your day. The bright, modern storefront offers smoothies, salads, cereal, and grab-and-go vegan fare, too. Though the storefront is tiny, a staircase leads to an upstairs room with balcony seating — perfect for people-watching while sipping your green juice.

    Red Dog Diner (3122 Magazine Street)

    The Red Dog’s rustic decor will reminds you of a farmhouse, and the menu is “refined comfort food” — an eclectic mix of Southern favorites and international influences (think gravlax and huevos rancheros; tasso shrimp and grits, and eggs Sardou). Brunch is served daily, and there’s even a breakfast happy hour on weekdays.

    Sarita’s Grill (4520 Freret Street)

    Cuban, Mexican and Central American fare like fish tacos and fried yucca plus excellent margaritas have earned Sarita’s a loyal local following. The guacamole is made in-house, servings are generous, and queso dip is complimentary.

    Satsuma (1320 Magazine St.)

    Satsuma’s menu is full of locally sourced dishes like eggs-and-kale scramble and a braised pork sandwich, plus coffee and fresh-squeezed juices. It also has another location Uptown, at 7901 Maple Street.

    Slim Goodies Diner (3322 Magazine Street)

    A cash-only, inexpensive local hangout with Southern staples and plenty of local color. Some of the house specialties are the inventively named slammers (different kinds of scrambles, from meaty to vegan, served with hash browns). The Creole Slammer, for instance, comes with a biscuit and crawfish etouffee. There’s also a lovely patio.

    Surrey’s Cafe & Juice Bar (4807 Magazine Street)

    Word to the wise: This BYOB  brunch destination often has long lines on Sunday mornings, so get there early. But even if you sleep in, a leisurely breakfast on the Surrey’s porch is more than worth the wait. Everyone’s tastes will be accommodated, from Louisiana cuisine fans (shrimp and grits, bananas Foster French toast) and vegans (tofu breakfast platter, organic juice) to breakfast purists (home fries with cheese).

    The Camellia Grill (626 S. Carrollton Avenue)

    This legendary New Orleans diner has been serving hearty omelets and pecan pie since 1946. There will probably be a line, but it moves quickly, and you can get breakfast all day.

    The High Hat Cafe (4500 Freret Street)

    This casual neighborhood eatery on the corner of Freret and Jena streets specializes in the Mississippi Delta and Louisiana staples like catfish, Gulf seafood, and slow-roasted pork served along with a long cocktail menu. Pimento cheese is prominently featured in the house burger, specialty fries, and even deviled eggs. How about a Southern feast of catfish with hushpuppies, braised greens, and black-eyed peas for brunch? Or try the Gumbo Ya-Ya with sweet potato salad. You’ll feel like you’re in an old-fashioned diner, only with a full bar. The tall glass windows offer a prime opportunity to people-watch, too.

    The Rook Cafe (4516 Freret Street)

    Rook, a quiet hangout popular with the locals, serves vegan pastries and locally roasted coffee. Free wi-fi and shelves lined with books and tabletop games are also a draw. The cozy coffee shop also hosts frequent gamers’ nights and pop-ups.

    The Ruby Slipper Cafe (2802 Magazine Street)

    This locally owned mini-chain is a must-go for heaping Southern staples like eggs cochon, croque madame, and Creole reuben. It’s got its award-winning formula down with generous portions, killer cocktails, upbeat and quick service, and the downhome vibe. Even if there’s a wait, it will be worth it.

    Hopefully this inspires you to go out and sample some local breakfast and brunch deliciousness near the Alder Hotel!

    Stay in touch and save on rates and more at the Alder Hotel by signing up for our email list at https://alderhotel.com/email-offers/. If you find a lower rate on your Alder Hotel room at the time of booking, call 1.888.626.5861, and we will match that rate, too.

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