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Alder Hotel - Uptown - New Orleans
4545 Magnolia St. New Orleans, LA 70115
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  1. Fun with Fido in Uptown New Orleans

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    pet friendly new orleans hotel alder hotel uptown new orleans

    New Orleans is a dog city, and there’s no reason to leave your four-legged family member at home when you travel to New Orleans, or at a hotel while you’re here. Here’s a list of places Uptown where you and your dog will always be welcome, plus a big dog run located elsewhere, but it’s easy to get to from Uptown (and your dog will thank you).

    We Are a Pet-Friendly Hotel

    We welcome dogs and cats at the Alder Hotel and look forward to hosting you and your pets when you stay in Uptown New Orleans. You can review our pet policy here. If you are traveling with large dogs (over 50 pounds) or need supervision for your dog while you sightsee, we recommend Zeus’ Place (4601 Freret St.).

    Parks and Dog Runs

    The Wisner Dog Run, located inside the free, city-run Wisner Playground at 4876 Laurel Street, is fenced off, so you can let your dog play off-leash with other well-socialized dogs. It’s not huge, at only 8,500 square feet, but the off-leash areas are not easy to come by in any city, and this one is part of a little urban park, so it also comes with access to benches, water fountains, and some shade — all in the middle of a busy Uptown area.

    Another option is to hit the urban oasis of the historic Audubon Park. You and your dog can enjoy the lagoons, a tranquil 1.8-mile jogging path, picnic shelters under the live oaks, and much more. The Riverview portion of the park, also known as The Fly, is located behind the Audubon Zoo and along the Mississippi River. It’s a popular spot to have a barbeque or a crawfish boil, toss a frisbee, or simply sit by the river and watch the sun go down. The Fly is open till 9 p.m. and is equipped with picnic areas, ample parking spaces, and public restrooms.

    The so-called “Dog Levee” is an informal park near the corner of Leake Avenue and Magazine Street (100-7198 Magazine Street). It has a paved walking path but is not fenced off. If your dog loves to swim and is not a flight risk when off-leash this is a good place to take a dip.

    The last recommended place on the list is not located Uptown, but it’s not far, worth the trip, and easy to get to. The largest off-leash dog run in New Orleans, NOLA City Bark, is located in the sprawling City Park that extends from Mid-City into Lakeview. This fenced-off dog park occupies a 4.6-acre plot of land and has separate play areas for small and big dogs. It also has hills and water fountains for the dogs to enjoy, plus water play area and doggie pools. For humans, there are also water fountains, shade pavilions, restrooms, and walking paths.

    Please note that NOLA City Bark is gated and you’ll need a key card/permit to enter. Temporary permits for visitors are available at the dog park office (1 Palm Drive). This is to ensure that all dogs that use the park have been properly vaccinated, and spayed or neutered.

    Dog-Friendly Bars and Restaurants

    There are plenty of dog-friendly restaurants and bars Uptown and elsewhere in the city. If there’s outdoor seating, like a patio or sidewalk tables, chances are all well-behaved dogs will be welcome. Uptown, check out the blocks-long commercial corridors of Magazine and Freret streets in particular, filled with sidewalk cafes and restaurants with outdoor seating.

    These few places stand out, however, as especially well-suited for your canine friends to visit.

    Dat Dog‘s both Uptown locations (3336 Magazine Street near Louisiana Avenue and 5030 Freret Street near Soniat Street) have dog-friendly outdoor seating. The Magazine Street location is great for people-watching, and both locations have popular happy hours and lots of craft beer. The Magazine Street location also hosts an art market in the outdoor area.

    Another popular Magazine Street establishment, the Bulldog Uptown, located on the corner of Magazine and Pleasant Streets in the heart of the Garden District, features a huge, dog-friendly patio. There’s fresh water put out daily for all furry friends.

    The lovely patios at St. James Cheese Company (the Uptown location at 5004 Prytania Street) and the Rusty Nail (1100 Constance Street, on the corner of Constance and John Churchill Chase, where the Warehouse District ends and the Lower Garden begins) are also popular among the dog lovers. What’s more enjoyable than having a leisurely drink on a spacious patio, surrounded by lush greenery, while your dog lounges at your feet?

    Want to stay in touch and save on rates at the Alder Hotel? Sign up for our email list at https://alderhotel.com/email-offers/! And if you find a lower rate on your Alder Hotel rooms at the time of booking, call 1.888.626.5861 to let us know, and we will match that rate.

  2. Coffee, Brunch, Lunch, and Co-Working Near the Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans

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    Here at the Alder Hotel, We know you don’t want to miss out on all the great food New Orleans has to offer. Fortunately, plenty of outstanding breakfast, brunch, and just-coffee options are just a short walk from our doorstep. From gluttonous to gluten-free, there’s an option to suit every palate. Here are our favorite picks, plus a few top recommendations on the best spots to co-work while you’re in town.

    Coffee

    Gracious Bakery + Cafe (4930 Prytania Street)

    The award-winning Gracious Bakery + Cafe has another location Uptown, at 2854 St. Charles Avenue, on the corner of 6th Street in the Garden District. All baked goods and breakfast sandwiches are top-notch, and there are house-made granola and house-cured salmon bagels.

    French Truck Coffee (4536 Dryades Street)

    Sandwiches, toast, pastries, and the best iced cold-drip coffee New Orleans has to offer, all served in a high-ceilinged, Edison bulb-hung space — that’s what you’ll find at French Truck Coffee. There’s no better way to while away a morning, iced latte in hand.

    Humble Bagel (4716 Freret Street)

    Humble Bagel’s creations are made in-house daily, from scratch, with just five ingredients, and in small batches (the proprietors are big on minimizing food waste and using locally sourced ingredients when possible). The place is open till 1 p.m. daily, or until they sell out. The menu is kept simple — bagels, cream cheese, and breakfast combos like eggs, bacon, and lox — and it’s worth getting up early for.

    La Boulangerie (4600 Magazine Street)

    The tarts, scones, quiches, and muffins at this French bakery and cafe are almost too pretty to eat, and all menu items are hand-prepared according to traditional recipes. Sit at a sidewalk table with an almond croissant and a cafe au lait and feel like you’ve been transported to Paris.

    Mojo Coffee House (4700 Freret Street)

    Stacks of local alt-weeklies? Check. College radio on the speakers? Check. Free wi-fi and plenty of table space for settling in and work for the long haul without receiving dirty looks from a barista? Check. Chalkboard menu? Check. This dim, cozy coffee house features all the coffee shop staples, plus its own locally roasted beans. Try the Mojo blend in a cup or take home a bag of beans as a souvenir. Sandwiches and pastries round out the menu. For those mornings when you just need caffeine and a quick bite, nothing beats Mojo.

    Raw Republic (4528 Magazine Street)

    Raw Republic’s cold-pressed, organic juices are a healthy way to kickstart your day. The bright, modern storefront offers coffee, smoothies, salads, cereal, and grab-and-go vegan fare, too. Though the storefront is tiny, a staircase leads to an upstairs room with balcony seating — perfect for people-watching while sipping your green juice.

    The Rook Cafe (4516 Freret Street)

    Rook, a quiet hangout popular with the locals, serves vegan pastries and locally roasted coffee. Free wi-fi and shelves lined with books and tabletop games are also a draw. The cozy coffee shop also hosts frequent gamers’ nights and pop-ups.

    Brunch

    Another Broken Egg Cafe (2917 Magazine Street)

    This is a popular brunch destination on the bustling commercial corridor of Magazine Street with pancakes, brunch specialties like crab cake Benedict and eggs with crawfish and Andouille, signature omelets, and specialty spiked cold brews and Bloody Marys served in mason jars.

    Bearcat Cafe (2521 Jena Street)

    While New Orleans is known for rich, decadent breakfasts like eggs Benedict (poached eggs, hollandaise and bacon layered over English muffins), not everyone wants heavy meals every day, even when on vacation. Maybe you’re looking for a break from indulgence, or maybe you adhere to a gluten-free, vegan lifestyle. Whatever your dietary requirements may be, you’ll find a delicious meal that satisfies them at Bearcat’s airy, industrial-chic space.

    The Camellia Grill (626 S. Carrollton Avenue)

    This legendary New Orleans diner has been serving hearty omelets and pecan pie since 1946. There will probably be a line, but it moves quickly, and you can get breakfast all day.

    Red Dog Diner (3122 Magazine Street)

    The Red Dog’s rustic decor will remind you of a farmhouse, and the menu is “refined comfort food” — an eclectic mix of Southern favorites and international influences (think gravlax and huevos rancheros; tasso shrimp and grits, and eggs Sardou). Brunch is served daily, and there’s even a breakfast happy hour on weekdays.

    Satsuma (1320 Magazine Street)

    Satsuma’s menu is full of locally sourced dishes like eggs-and-kale scramble and a braised pork sandwich, plus coffee and fresh-squeezed juices. It also has another location Uptown, at 7901 Maple Street.

    Slim Goodies Diner (3322 Magazine Street)

    A cash-only, inexpensive local hangout with Southern staples and plenty of local color. Some of the house specialties are the inventively named slammers (different kinds of scrambles, from meaty to vegan, served with hash browns). The Creole Slammer, for instance, comes with a biscuit and crawfish étouffée. There’s also a lovely patio.

    Surrey’s Uptown (4807 Magazine Street)

    Word to the wise: This BYOB  brunch destination often has long lines on Sunday mornings, so get there early. But even if you sleep in, a leisurely breakfast on the Surrey’s porch is more than worth the wait. Everyone’s tastes will be accommodated, from Louisiana cuisine fans (shrimp and grits, bananas Foster French toast) and vegans (tofu breakfast platter, organic juice) to breakfast purists (home fries with cheese).

    The Ruby Slipper Cafe (2802 Magazine Street)

    This locally owned mini-chain is a must-go for heaping Southern staples like eggs cochon, croque madame, and Creole reuben. It’s got its award-winning formula down with generous portions, killer cocktails, upbeat and quick service, and the downhome vibe. Even if there’s a wait, it will be worth it.

    Lunch

    Ancora (4508 Freret Street)

    Ancora’s pizza is made Neapolitan-style, using wood-burning ovens and without commercial yeast. Ancora makes its own starter, and the dough takes three days to prepare from start to finish, with the crust that is unique to New Orleans. Drinks include seasonal Italian sodas, craft cocktails, and wines from the Campania region of southern Italy. Ancora is located in a renovated building next to High Hat Cafe.

    Cure (4905 Freret Street)

    A popular destination for cocktail lovers, Cure is a stylish, upscale lounge located inside a renovated firehouse. There you can sip your Old-Fashioned surrounded by bottles of whiskey from around the world, including the hard-to-find, rare and reserve varieties. The well-reviewed menu offers a rotation of frequently changing cocktails made by seasoned mixologists along with small plates and bar snacks. This would have to be lunch on a later side, as Cure opens at 3 p.m. on weekends.

    Dat Dog (5030 Freret Street; 3336 Magazine Street)

    Dat Dog’s both Uptown locations have dog-friendly outdoor seating, great for people-watching too. At its Freret Street location, the affordable Dat Dog dishes out a wide variety of meat, fish, vegan and veggie hot dogs, sausages, and other kid-friendly comfort food like burgers and chicken. The dogs and the sausages come with a choice of more than 30 toppings.

    High Hat Cafe (4500 Freret Street)

    This casual neighborhood eatery on the corner of Freret and Jena streets specializes in the Mississippi Delta and Louisiana staples like catfish, Gulf seafood, and slow-roasted pork served along with a long cocktail menu. Pimento cheese is prominently featured in the house burger, specialty fries, and even deviled eggs. How about a Southern feast of catfish with hushpuppies, braised greens, and black-eyed peas for brunch? Or try the Gumbo Ya-Ya with sweet potato salad. You’ll feel like you’re in an old-fashioned diner, only with a full bar. The tall glass windows offer a prime opportunity to people-watch, too.

    Mint Modern Vietnamese Bistro & Bar (5100 Freret Street)

    Mint’s streamlined menu is modern indeed, packed with specialty rolls, several varieties of pho, banh mi, and a kimchi burger. One of the unusual specialty cocktails is Fishy Surprise, which is made with whiskey, Drambuie, grapefruit juice, and fish sauce.

    Piccola Gelateria (4525 Freret Street)

    In addition to small-batch, house-made gelato and sorbetto in over a dozen flavors, this classic Italian-style gelato shop offers crepes (savory with meat, sweet with Nutella, and vegetarian). Piccola Gelateria sources local milk and cream, and sells its own, custom-blended, micro-roasted espresso. The place opens at noon, and could also serve well as a brunch destination.

    Sarita’s Grill (4520 Freret Street)

    Cuban, Mexican and Central American fare like fish tacos and fried yucca plus excellent margaritas have earned Sarita’s a loyal local following. The guacamole is made in-house, servings are generous, and queso dip is complimentary.

    The Company Burger (4600 Freret Street)

    We also recommend The Company Burger on Freret and Cadiz streets for its solid menu of delicious burgers, fries and milkshakes. The menu keeps it simple with the award-winning lamb, turkey, and beef burgers, plus sides, shakes, and cocktails. The house burger comes with a fried egg, two patties, and bacon. The “not burger” options are also kept simple: hot dogs, and grilled cheese and fried chicken sandwiches.

    Best Place to Co-Working Near the Alder Hotel

    There’s something to be said for exploring a new city while leaving your everyday life and responsibilities behind. But occasionally, circumstances dictate that you bring your work on the road. It’s not an ideal situation, but it’s reality for many travelers. The silver lining? At many co-working locations, you can accomplish your tasks while soaking up uniquely New Orleans experiences — and see a side of the city that’s hidden from most tourists. These co-working destinations are less than two miles from the Alder Hotel, and all offer free wi-fi or public computers, along with a little lagniappe of grand, historic settings. The coffee shops and cafes listed above are also a good bet if you want a good, strong cup of locally sourced coffee while you work.

    Howard-Tilton Memorial Library (Tulane University, 7001 Freret St.)

    The Tulane library offers all the perks of being a student, without the stressful final exams. Situated on Tulane University’s lush, live oak-filled campus, this six-story library is a haven of solitude, and it’s open to the public from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. daily (after that hour, only library cardholders may enter the building). Visitor computers are available on the first floor of the Research Help Center, but wi-fi is limited to student use only. Head to the third-floor stacks if you’re seeking a quiet study area, or grab a cup of locally roasted coffee at PJ’s on the first floor.

    Latter Branch Public Library (5120 St. Charles Ave.)

    Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this gorgeous 1907 neo-Italianate mansion on St. Charles Avenue would be worth a visit even if it didn’t offer all the amenities of a public library. The limestone building was donated to the city of New Orleans in 1958, and its beauty has been preserved: think chandelier-hung, antiques-furnished reading rooms, Dutch ceiling murals and mahogany paneling. On the more technology-centered side, there’s printing, wi-fi (out-of-town visitors get a free one-hour pass with a valid I.D.), computers for public use, and an outdoor garden seating. It’s a way to be productive while experiencing a completely New Orleans setting.

    Propeller Incubator (4035 Washington Ave.)

    Looking for blazing-fast wi-fi, free coffee, printing, scanners, copy machines and a community of like-minded individuals? This 10,000-square-foot, industrial-chic space is the spot. Co-working desks can be rented by the day or month, or you can buy a 10-day punch card. And if you need to organize a presentation during your visit, there are projector-equipped conference rooms available to rent. Propeller is open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., with 24/7 access available for members.

    Stay in touch and save on rates and more at the Alder Hotel by signing up for our email list at https://alderhotel.com/email-offers/. If you find a lower rate on your Alder Hotel room at the time of booking, call 1.888.626.5861, and we will match that rate, too.

  3. Where to Get Breakfast Near the Alder Hotel Uptown

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    Breakfast is the most important meal of the day… and that goes double when you’re vacationing in New Orleans. It offers both an opportunity to recover from the previous night and a chance to build a solid foundation for a busy day. And if you are not an early riser, and depending on how much time you have, breakfast can morph into a lingering brunch! Whether you’re looking to chow down on banana pancakes or sip a cold-pressed green juice, there’s a breakfast or brunch spot for you within a stone’s throw (or a short ride away) of your room at Alder Hotel Uptown.

    Another Broken Egg Cafe (2917 Magazine Street)

    This is a popular brunch destination on the bustling commercial corridor of Magazine Street with pancakes, brunch specialties like crab cake Benedict and eggs with crawfish and Andouille, signature omelets, and specialty spiked cold brews and Bloody Marys served in mason jars.

    Bearcat Cafe (2521 Jena Street)

    Less than a block off Freret Street and within walking distance of Ochsner Baptist Medical Center and the Tulane and Loyola University area, this full-service cafe offers lunch and breakfast plus sustainable coffee. The menu is mostly comfort food, divided into “Good Cat” and “Bad Cat” sections. The lighter fare is full of gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan options like vegan tofu scramble and house-made yogurt. The hearty “Bad Cat” offers items like traditional breakfast fare of the eggs-and-bacon variety, and Southern staples like shrimp and grits.

    French Truck Coffee (4536 Dryades Street)

    Sandwiches, toast, pastries, and the best iced cold-drip coffee New Orleans has to offer, all served in a high-ceilinged, Edison bulb-hung space — that’s what you’ll find at French Truck Coffee. There’s no better way to while away a morning, iced latte in hand.

    Gracious Bakery + Cafe (4930 Prytania Street)

    The award-winning Gracious Bakery + Cafe has another location Uptown, at 2854 St. Charles Avenue, on the corner of 6th Street in the Garden District. All baked goods and breakfast sandwiches are top notch, and there are house-made granola and house-cured salmon bagels.

    Humble Bagel (4716 Freret Street)

    Humble Bagel’s creations are made in-house daily, from scratch, with just five ingredients, and in small batches (the proprietors are big on minimizing food waste and using locally sourced ingredients when possible). The place is open till 1 p.m. daily, or until they sell out. The menu is kept simple — bagels, cream cheese, and breakfast combos like eggs, bacon, and lox — and it’s worth getting up early for.

    La Boulangerie (4600 Magazine Street)

    The tarts, scones, quiches, and muffins at this French bakery and cafe are almost too pretty to eat, and all menu items are hand-prepared according to traditional recipes. Sit at a sidewalk table with an almond croissant and a cafe au lait and feel like you’ve been transported to Paris.

    Mojo Coffee House (4700 Freret St.)

    Looking for a cozy, welcoming hangout where you can grab small-batch roasted coffee, a vegan muffin, and connect to wi-fi? Mojo Coffee House is the spot. You won’t find full kitchen service at this laid-back coffee house (the counter-service destination is more of a pastry-and-sandwich variety), but for those mornings when you just need caffeine and a quick bite, nothing beats Mojo.

    Piccola Gelateria (4525 Freret Street)

    In addition to small-batch, house-made gelato and sorbetto in about 18 flavors, this classic Italian-style gelato shop offers crepes (savory with meat, sweet with Nutella, and vegetarian). Piccola Gelateria sources local milk and cream, and sells its own, custom-blended, micro-roasted espresso. The place opens at noon, and could serve well as a brunch destination.

    Raw Republic (4528 Magazine Street)

    Raw Republic’s cold-pressed, organic juices are a healthy way to kickstart your day. The bright, modern storefront offers smoothies, salads, cereal, and grab-and-go vegan fare, too. Though the storefront is tiny, a staircase leads to an upstairs room with balcony seating — perfect for people-watching while sipping your green juice.

    Red Dog Diner (3122 Magazine Street)

    The Red Dog’s rustic decor will reminds you of a farmhouse, and the menu is “refined comfort food” — an eclectic mix of Southern favorites and international influences (think gravlax and huevos rancheros; tasso shrimp and grits, and eggs Sardou). Brunch is served daily, and there’s even a breakfast happy hour on weekdays.

    Sarita’s Grill (4520 Freret Street)

    Cuban, Mexican and Central American fare like fish tacos and fried yucca plus excellent margaritas have earned Sarita’s a loyal local following. The guacamole is made in-house, servings are generous, and queso dip is complimentary.

    Satsuma (1320 Magazine St.)

    Satsuma’s menu is full of locally sourced dishes like eggs-and-kale scramble and a braised pork sandwich, plus coffee and fresh-squeezed juices. It also has another location Uptown, at 7901 Maple Street.

    Slim Goodies Diner (3322 Magazine Street)

    A cash-only, inexpensive local hangout with Southern staples and plenty of local color. Some of the house specialties are the inventively named slammers (different kinds of scrambles, from meaty to vegan, served with hash browns). The Creole Slammer, for instance, comes with a biscuit and crawfish etouffee. There’s also a lovely patio.

    Surrey’s Cafe & Juice Bar (4807 Magazine Street)

    Word to the wise: This BYOB  brunch destination often has long lines on Sunday mornings, so get there early. But even if you sleep in, a leisurely breakfast on the Surrey’s porch is more than worth the wait. Everyone’s tastes will be accommodated, from Louisiana cuisine fans (shrimp and grits, bananas Foster French toast) and vegans (tofu breakfast platter, organic juice) to breakfast purists (home fries with cheese).

    The Camellia Grill (626 S. Carrollton Avenue)

    This legendary New Orleans diner has been serving hearty omelets and pecan pie since 1946. There will probably be a line, but it moves quickly, and you can get breakfast all day.

    The High Hat Cafe (4500 Freret Street)

    This casual neighborhood eatery on the corner of Freret and Jena streets specializes in the Mississippi Delta and Louisiana staples like catfish, Gulf seafood, and slow-roasted pork served along with a long cocktail menu. Pimento cheese is prominently featured in the house burger, specialty fries, and even deviled eggs. How about a Southern feast of catfish with hushpuppies, braised greens, and black-eyed peas for brunch? Or try the Gumbo Ya-Ya with sweet potato salad. You’ll feel like you’re in an old-fashioned diner, only with a full bar. The tall glass windows offer a prime opportunity to people-watch, too.

    The Rook Cafe (4516 Freret Street)

    Rook, a quiet hangout popular with the locals, serves vegan pastries and locally roasted coffee. Free wi-fi and shelves lined with books and tabletop games are also a draw. The cozy coffee shop also hosts frequent gamers’ nights and pop-ups.

    The Ruby Slipper Cafe (2802 Magazine Street)

    This locally owned mini-chain is a must-go for heaping Southern staples like eggs cochon, croque madame, and Creole reuben. It’s got its award-winning formula down with generous portions, killer cocktails, upbeat and quick service, and the downhome vibe. Even if there’s a wait, it will be worth it.

    Hopefully this inspires you to go out and sample some local breakfast and brunch deliciousness near the Alder Hotel!

    Stay in touch and save on rates and more at the Alder Hotel by signing up for our email list at https://alderhotel.com/email-offers/. If you find a lower rate on your Alder Hotel room at the time of booking, call 1.888.626.5861, and we will match that rate, too.

  4. Fun for Couples in Uptown New Orleans

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    Uptown New Orleans

    New Orleans is considered one of the most romantic destinations in the country, if not the world. It’s easy to have a great time on a date in practically any part of this city, but Uptown holds its own against, say, the French Quarter, by bringing its historic past as the “American sector” and its unique charm into the equation.

    There you’ll find majestic mansions under the canopies of the centuries-old live oaks, charming, dimly lit restaurants, modern cafes, shopping for blocks, photogenic streetcars, and iconic bars with the world-class live music pouring out on any given night. Impressing your loved one doesn’t need to break the bank, either. In New Orleans, even a morning stroll in the park could bring on the magic. Here are our suggestions for some fun activities for couples in Uptown New Orleans.

    Breakfast

    Whether you would prefer to linger with a cocktail or want to have a quick yet solid breakfast at a diner, Uptown has no shortage of high-to-low options. If you’re looking for an inexpensive local hangout with Southern staples and plenty of local color, the fun, upbeat Slim Goodies Diner on Magazine Street won’t steer you wrong with its inventively named slammers (different kinds of scrambles, from meaty to vegan, served with hash browns). The Creole Slammer, for instance, comes with a biscuit and crawfish etouffee.

    Another inexpensive option is the Camellia Grill, a legendary Carrollton Avenue diner that’s been serving hearty omelets and pecan pie since 1946. There will probably be a line, but it moves quickly, and you can get breakfast all day.

    If you are coffee-and-a-pastry-for-breakfast people, the incomparable Gracious Bakery + Cafe has two locations Uptown, at 2854 St. Charles Avenue on the corner of 6th Street in the Garden District, and at 4930 Prytania Street. All baked goods and breakfast sandwiches are top notch, and there are house-made granola and house-cured salmon bagels.

    Looking for a cozy, welcoming hangout where you can grab small-batch roasted coffee, a vegan muffin and connect to wi-fi? Mojo Coffee House at 4700 Freret St. is the spot. You won’t find full kitchen service at this laid-back coffee house but for caffeine and a quick bite, nothing beats Mojo. French Truck Coffee (4536 Dryades St.) has the best iced cold-drip coffee New Orleans has to offer,  served in a high-ceilinged, Edison bulb-hung space.

    For a serious coffee selection and plenty of vegan and vegetarian options in a bright, modern setting try the Satsuma location on Maple Street (there’s also one at 1320 Magazine St.). The menu is full of locally sourced dishes like the eggs-and-kale scramble and pancakes.

    Another excellent option is the beautiful La Boulangerie (4600 Magazine St.), a French bakery and cafe with all the menu items are hand-prepared according to traditional recipes and sidewalk tables.

    Surrey’s Cafe and Juice Bar (4807 Magazine Street) might have a line, but a leisurely breakfast on the porch at this BYOB  brunch destination is worth the wait. The menu is a medley that will make you happy, regardless whether you’re a breakfast purist, a vegan, or a Louisiana cuisine fan. The juice bar is organic.

    St. Charles Streetcar

    Not just a means of public transportation, the historic St. Charles Avenue line streetcar is on many visitors’ bucket list because it’s the oldest continuously operating streetcar line in the world (since 1835). It will set you back $1.25 per person, and the route is scenic as it gets, with the columned mansions surrounded by the impressive gardens and wrought-iron fences. Take it either all the way from Canal Street to the end of the line by the River, or hop on and off along St. Charles Avenue to take in the sights.

    Walking Tours

    Spend some time taking in the extraordinary beauty of Uptown’s many architectural styles. Whether you prefer to explore on foot, by car or bus, both self-guided and guided tours are available daily. You can just walk around the historic district spotting celebrity houses and marveling at the gardens, or hop on the streetcar to visit the historic Lafayette Cemetery No. 1.

    Audubon Park and The Fly

    The streetcar also brings you right to the urban oasis of the historic Audubon Park. Located near the picturesque campuses of Tulane and Loyola universities, Audubon Park is perfect for a stroll among the oaks and the lagoons, or a picnic (bring some bread to feed the ducks). The area behind the Audubon Zoo and along the Mississippi River, known as The Fly, is a lovely spot to simply sit and watch the boats go by.

    Shopping

    Magazine and Freret streets, and St. Charles Avenue are all commercial hubs with block after block of shopping destinations. Magazine Street in particular is worth (an easy walk) for about 10 blocks, which are packed with sidewalk cafes, galleries, antique stores, vintage boutiques, and funky local costume stores. Get some locally made New Orleans-centric gear at Dirty Coast or Fleurty Girl, or satisfy your costuming and vintage needs at Funky Monkey and Miss Claudia’s Vintage Clothing & Costumes.

    Lunch and Dinner

    Uptown has many cozy, romantic spots for either a lingering lunch or a romantic dinner date. La Crepe Nanou, located on the corner of Robert and Prytania Streets, is an intimate French bistro with a fantastic selection of sweet and savory crepes and a wine list to complement them. It’s consistently voted as the “most romantic” on various lists for its ambiance. Another small, French-Italian bistro, Lilette, boasts a heated patio, cozy booths and a sophisticated, sharable menu. Patois puts a local spin on mussels, grilled Gulf shrimp and southern staples like sweetbreads in a lovely, softly-lit setting.

    You’ll find exposed brick, chandeliers and gleaming hardwood floors at Coquette, another sophisticated Magazine Street destination with a locally sourced menu and craft cocktails. Choose from the small and big plate menus, or put yourselves into the chef’s capable hands with a five-course blind tasting.

    For authentic Sicilian cuisine head to Avo. The seasonal menu is bursting with seafood (try the charred octopus) and homemade pasta dishes. The interior is gorgeous, but see if you can score a table in the candlelit courtyard, perfect for a special occasion.

    And let’s round up this by-no-means-complete list of the most romantic Uptown restaurants with the iconic Upperline. It’s a must if you love art and want a taste of Creole New Orleans. This award-winning local favorite is located in an 1877 townhouse, with its walls and the shelves containing hundreds of paintings, pottery, sculpture, photography, and Jazz Fest posters collected by the owner and hostess, JoAnn Clevenger. The menu is elevated contemporary Creole, with a three-course, prix fixe tasting option of seven Creole classics like turtle soup and fried green tomatoes under $50.

    A Movie

    Few things are more romantic than catching a classic movie in a century-old theater, especially on a rainy day. Prytania Theatre is the oldest theater in the city and the only single-screen one left in Louisiana. Inside, you’ll find plush red seats and a tiny coffee stand with excellent gelato and espresso. Prytania screens the classics like Citizen Cane and Casablanca regularly, and cult classics at midnight.

    Happy Hour

    You haven’t gotten a taste of classic romantic New Orleans if you haven’t visited Pascal’s Manale Restaurant for happy hour, with half off all of their expertly prepared cocktails and raw oysters. Watch the oysters getting shucked in front of you in this dark-paneled, elegant space with a martini in hand, and maybe stay for dinner to sample Pascal’s legendary BBQ shrimp and veal Picatta.

    Pizza Domenica on Magazine Street offers excellent wine and draft beer lists as well as half off its wood-fired pizzas (some of the best in New Orleans) on weekdays, 3-5 p.m. If you’d like to share some wine, head to Bar Frances on Freret Street, to sample its excellent selection during a generous happy hour.

    One of the most recent additions to the romantic roster of the Uptown destinations is also one of its most beautiful. Cavan bills itself as a coastal American restaurant, but with its airy setting in a converted two-story Victorian mansion, Gulf-centric small plates, and elegant southern twists on the aperitifs and champagne cocktails it’s also unmistakably, uniquely New Orleans.

    Music

    Dance the sultry night away at the iconic Tipitina’s, which has hosted everyone from world-famous acts in town for Jazz Fest to local brass bands and the Mardi Gras Indians. The Maple Leaf Bar, with its tin ceiling and a hopping dance floor, has live music every night at 10 p.m., including the long-standing Tuesday gig by the Rebirth Brass Band. Don’t miss that.

    Want some exclusive deals and discounts on your stay at the Alder Hotel? Sign up for our email list at https://alderhotel.com/email-offers/. And if you find a lower rate on your Alder Hotel room at the time of booking, call 1.888.626.5861, and we will match it!

    Lunch and Dinner

    Uptown has many cozy, romantic spots for either a lingering lunch or a romantic dinner date. La Crepe Nanou, located on the corner of Robert and Prytania Streets, is an intimate French bistro with a fantastic selection of sweet and savory crepes and a wine list to complement them. It’s consistently voted as the “most romantic” on various lists for its ambiance. Another small, French-Italian bistro, Lilette, boasts a heated patio, cozy booths and a sophisticated, sharable menu. Patois, helmed by Chef Aaron Burgau, puts a local spin on mussels, grilled Gulf shrimp and southern staples like sweetbreads in a lovely, softly-lit setting.

    You’ll find exposed brick, chandeliers and gleaming hardwood floors at Coquette, another sophisticated Magazine Street destination with a locally sourced menu and craft cocktails. Choose from the small and big plate menus, or put yourselves into the chef’s capable hands with a five-course blind tasting.

    For authentic Sicilian cuisine by the renowned Chef Nick Lama head to Avo. The seasonal menu is bursting with seafood (try the charred octopus) and homemade pasta dishes. The interior is gorgeous, but see if you can score a table in the candlelit courtyard, perfect for a special occasion.

    And let’s round up this by-no-means-complete list of the most romantic Uptown restaurants with the iconic Upperline. It’s a must if you love art and want a taste of Creole New Orleans. This award-winning local favorite is located in an 1877 townhouse, with its walls and the shelves containing hundreds of paintings, pottery, sculpture, photography, and Jazzfest posters collected by the owner and hostess, JoAnn Clevenger. The menu is elevated contemporary Creole, with a three-course,  prix fixe tasting option of seven Creole classics like turtle soup and fried green tomatoes ($48).

    A Movie

    Few things are more romantic than catching a classic movie in a century-old theater, especially on a rainy day. Prytania Theatre is the oldest theater in the city and the only single-screen one left in Louisiana. Inside, you’ll find plush red seats and a tiny coffee stand with excellent gelato and espresso. Prytania screens the classics like Citizen Cane and Casablanca regularly, and cult classics at midnight.

    Happy Hour

    You haven’t gotten a taste of classic romantic New Orleans if you haven’t visited Pascal’s Manale Restaurant for happy hour, with half off all of their expertly prepared cocktails and raw oysters. Watch the oysters getting shucked in front of you in this dark-paneled, elegant space with a martini in hand, and maybe stay for dinner to sample Pascal’s legendary BBQ shrimp and veal Picatta.

    Pizza Domenica on Magazine Street offers excellent wine and draft beer lists as well as half off its wood-fired pizzas (some of the best in New Orleans) on weekdays, 3-5 p.m. If you’d like to share some wine, head to Bar Frances on Freret Street, 4-6 p.m. on weekdays. Wine cocktails are $4, wine by the glass is $5, and the carafes are $14.

    One of the most recent additions to the romantic roster of the Uptown destinations is also one of its most beautiful. Cavan bills itself as a coastal American restaurant, but with its airy setting in a converted two-story Victorian mansion, Gulf-centric small plates, and elegant southern twists on the aperitifs and champagne cocktails it’s also unmistakably, uniquely New Orleans.

    Music

    Dance the sultry night away at the iconic Tipitina’s, which has hosted everyone from world-famous acts in town for Jazz Fest to local brass bands and the Mardi Gras Indians. The Maple Leaf Bar, with its tin ceiling and a hopping dance floor, has live music every night at 10 p.m., including the long-standing Tuesday gig by the Rebirth Brass Band. Don’t miss that.

  5. Alder Hotel’s Top 12 Reasons to Stay in the Freret Neighborhood of Uptown New Orleans

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    The Freret neighborhood, where the Alder Hotel is located, is full of historic destinations, architectural landmarks, lush greenery, delicious culinary adventures, and fun shopping. There’s plenty to see, do, eat, and drink around here. Here are our top 12 reasons to stay at the Alder Hotel in the historic Freret neighborhood.

    1. Free Parking

    The Alder Hotel offers free self-parking in the parking lot directly across the street. It’s relatively rare to find this amenity in New Orleans, so grab this opportunity pronto! There’s also street parking available near the hotel, but it might be limited depending on time of day and year.

    2. You Can Bring Your Pet

    We are a pet-friendly New Orleans hotel. We welcome dogs and cats, and look forward to hosting you and your pets when you stay in Uptown New Orleans. You can review our pet policy here. If you are traveling with large dogs (over 50 pounds) or need supervision for your dog while you sightsee, we recommend Zeus’ Place (4601 Freret St.).

    Want to take your furry friend with you wherever you go? No problem! The Freret neighborhood, like much of New Orleans, is very dog-friendly. You’ll find a few parks and dog runs nearby, and plenty of restaurants and cafes in the area that will welcome your dog and put out a water bowl.

    3. Navigation Is Easy

    You can explore much of the neighborhood on foot, but, the most popular way to do it is to ride the historic streetcar along St. Charles Avenue. You can ride for $1.25, exact change; or get a $3 day pass for unlimited rides (also, check out our preferred and therefore most recommended walking route from the hotel to catch the St. Charles Ave. streetcar).

    Take the streetcar from the CBD/downtown all the way upriver, or anywhere in between, as the streetcar stops on almost every block along St. Charles Avenue. The Italianate, Victorian and Greek Revival architecture of Uptown is unique, and many of the original mid-19th century mansions have been immaculately preserved and are surrounded by the impressive gardens. Heading into Carrolton and toward the Mississippi River, the imposing facades and sprawling balconies become generously mixed with the more modest but still well-preserved shotguns and thriving local businesses, including some of the best bars and restaurants in the city.

    4. Shopping and Entertainment on Freret Street

    One of the main attractions in the neighborhood is Freret Street, named after an antebellum New Orleans mayor. The stately mansions mix with the historic shotguns, surrounding the thriving eight-block corridor of Freret Street between Napoleon and Jefferson avenues. Due to the robust recovery and development efforts led by the locally-owned small businesses, developers, and the city administration, the street got an injection of the much needed business and renovation, and is showing no signs of slowing down. The neighborhood enjoys its own monthly market and an annual festival, both held along Freret Street’s commercial strip. It even has its own Carnival krewe, Krewe of Freret, which parades during Mardi Gras and hosts a summer stroll.

    5. The Lively Commercial Corridor of Magazine Street

    Magazine Street runs parallel to St. Charles Avenue, about 10 blocks apart. Just like Freret Street’s revitalized strip, the 13 blocks of Magazine Street are meant to be walked. It’s the main commercial artery that the Garden District and Uptown share, and it’s crammed with restaurants, bars, sidewalk cafes, and dozens of retail stores where you can buy local art, antiques, vintage clothing, funky costumes, and more.

    6. Numerous Options for Eating and Drinking Your Way Through the Neighborhood

    Just walking down the Freret Street or Magazine Street corridors will bring you to the top-notch (and some of the most diverse) shopping and entertainment destinations. Of course, there’s plenty to eat and drink there as well.

    You can start your day with breakfast at the Camellia Grill, a landmark diner beloved by locals and visitors alike since 1946 and famous for its pecan pie, “freezes” and generous omelets. For lunch, try alligator sausage at the affordable Dat Dog. Catfish is the star of the menu of the Louisiana-meets-the-Delta High Hat Cafe, and The Company Burger offers potent house cocktail along its milkshakes and lamb burgers.

    Is it happy hour yet? Have a craft cocktail at Cure or a glass of an award-winning wine at Bar Frances. If you like a dozen raw oysters with your martini, head to the iconic Pascal Manale, where oysters are shucked right in front of you and a happy hour is a decades-long tradition.

    For another popular happy hour, head to Superior Seafood & Oyster Bar to take advantage of its full-service oyster bar: the raw oysters are 50 cents, and Superior’s signature frozen pomegranate mojito is two-for-one.

    Another option is The Avenue Pub, the iconic Lower Garden District pub that boasts fireplaces, tin ceilings, a balcony overlooking St. Charles Avenue, a pool table, and sidewalk and patio seating. The downstairs bar is open 24/7 and the small kitchen churns out high-quality pub grub.

    There are numerous options to have an unforgettable dinner Uptown, from high to low and casual to iconic. Where you head for dinner depends on whether you’re looking for something more casual and on the budget, want to cross off a few items from your New Orleans food bucket list, or want to fully immerse yourself in experiencing a night out somewhere busy and packed with nightlife and action. (See our dining guides below to help you pick a perfect dining destination.)

    Two of our favorites won’t ever steer you wrong: The James Beard Award winner Chef Donald Link’s Herbsaint, the flagship of the Link Restaurant Group (which runs several businesses including Peche, Cochon and La Boulangerie), and Desi Vega’s Steakhouse, an elegant, high-ceilinged classic steakhouse with a few local touches, located inside the Lafayette Hotel, a French Regency-style 1916 landmark overlooking Lafayette Square.

    7. The Historic Audubon Park and Zoo

    The magnificent 19th-century, 350-acre Audubon Park that contains the Audubon Zoo is perfect for a stroll. Lined with hundreds of ancient live oaks, it features a 1.8-mile jogging path, playgrounds, picnic shelters, a lagoon, recreation areas, and much more. The Audubon Zoois one of the top zoos in the country, full of lush vegetation and exotic animal exhibits. The Zoo features rare white alligators, sea lion shows, a carousel, and the award-winning Louisiana Swamp and Jaguar Jungle natural habitat areas.

    8. Loyola and Tulane Universities

    Right across Audubon Park you’ll find the campuses of Tulane and Loyola universities. Both boast an architectural mix of styles of the 19th century and modern, with the backdrop of large live oaks. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places, Tulane University’s campus occupies more than 110 acres and extends north to S. Claiborne Avenue through Freret and Willow streets. Note that the Newcomb Art Museum on Tulane University’s campus is free and open to the public. Past and present exhibitions have focused on contributions by women artists in the multi-disciplinary fields spanning art and design.

    You can find Loyola’s sprawling main campus adjacent to Tulane and facing St. Charles Avenue and the Audubon Park. It was established in 1904 on the land purchased by the New Orleans Jesuits in 1889. Marquette Hall is the oldest campus building and is the iconic image of the university you’ll probably recognize the most.

    9. Lafayette Cemetery No. 1

    No Uptown architectural tour is complete without hitting the above-ground Lafayette Cemetery No. 1 on Washington Avenue, in the heart of the Garden District. It’s the oldest of the seven city-operated cemeteries in New Orleans, with some interesting society tombs (the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and Home For Destitute Orphan Boys among them) and over a thousand family tombs. The iconic cemetery has served as a popular backdrop for many music videos and movies over the years. Right across the street is the incomparable Commander’s Palace, where you will find elevated Creole fare and a 25-cent martini lunch special.

    10. Ochsner Baptist Medical Center

    The hotel’s close proximity to the Ochsner Baptist sprawling medical campus means you get the advantage of the dedicated security patrolling the area. It’s also one of the best, fully staffed medical centers in Louisiana, should you need any medical services during your stay.

    11. Enjoying a Free Workout During Your Stay

    Staying at the Alder Hotel comes with another perk: Guests can work out for free 24/7 at

    Anytime Fitness (the 4600 Freret St. location), which offers state-of-the-art cardio machines, free weights and exercise classes. Pick up a key at the front desk and ask the concierge for directions; it’s just a five-minute walk away.

    12. Catching a Movie at the Longest Continually Operated Theater in the South

    More than a century old, the family-run Prytania Theatre screens first-run features daily, and hosts screenings of classic movies every Wednesday and Saturday. Grab some buttered popcorn, or a gourmet treat from the espresso bar, and sit back and enjoy the show.

    Want to dig deeper? Explore our up-to-date Uptown guides to help you get the most of your stay:

    Food and Drink
    10 Dishes That Define New Orleans and Where to Try Them Uptown
    New Orleans Food Bucket List, Uptown Edition
    Where to Get Breakfast Near the Alder Hotel Uptown Coffee and Brunch Near the Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans
    Where to Get Lunch Near the Alder Hotel Uptown
    Late Night Eats Uptown New Orleans
    A Night on Freret Street
    Where to Find Snoballs Near the Alder Hotel in Uptown New Orleans

    Sightseeing
    Guide: Navigating the Freret Neighborhood and Uptown New Orleans
    Essential Stops and Sights Along the St. Charles Avenue Streetcar Route
    Our Neighborhood — Most Popular Attractions Near the Alder Hotel
    Architectural Landmarks — Uptown New Orleans
    Things to Do on Loyola and Tulane Campuses – Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans
    Exploring Uptown New Orleans on a Budget

    Shopping
    Shopping Near Alder Hotel Uptown New Orleans
    Shopping the Freret Market
    Edible Souvenirs From New Orleans
    Guide to the New Orleans Art Markets

    Planning Your Itinerary
    Your Itinerary: 24-Hours in Uptown New Orleans
    Rainy Day Fun Near the Alder Hotel
    Uptown New Orleans: A Family-Friendly Itinerary
    Fun with Fido in Uptown New Orleans
    Fun for Couples in Uptown New Orleans Staying Fit in Uptown New Orleans Best Places to Co-work Near the Alder Hotel in Uptown New Orleans

  6. Late Night Eats Uptown New Orleans

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    late-night-eats-uptown-new-orleans

    Although New Orleans can’t claim, like some other cities, that it never sleeps it surely goes to bed late. This is good news for those of us who want diverse and affordable food options after most restaurants stop serving dinner. Here are our recommendations for the Uptown area of New Orleans, which can hopefully help you make smart and satisfying food choices in the wee hours — whether you want a full decadent meal, a healthy snack to go, or some comfort food.

    Bouligny Tavern
    3641 Magazine St.
    This chic gastropub is located just outside the Garden District on Magazine Street, right next to its sister restaurant, Lilette. There’s a heated patio that’s perfect for winding down with one the restaurant’s signature cocktails, and small plates like anchovy toast and mushroom bruschetta.
    Open till: Mon.-Thu.: Midnight; Fri.-Sat.: 2 a.m.

    Camellia Grill
    626 S. Carrollton Ave.
    This landmark 1940s diner in the Carrollton section of New Orleans, located on Carrollton Avenue near its intersection with St. Charles Avenue on the St. Charles Streetcar line, is worth the wait if there happens to be a line. It’s a go-to for both a late-night stopover and an early breakfast. The bow-tied, jacketed servers are famously friendly, the service is fast, and the omelets are divine. The place is also known for its freezes and pecan pie heated on the grill.
    Open till: Sun.-Thu.: Midnight; Fri.-Sat.: 2 a.m.

    Cooter Brown’s
    509 S. Carrollton Ave.
    Cooter Brown’s has been a Riverbend/Black Pearl college hangout since the 1970s. With its 17 TVs and over 400 beers, including a variety of craft beer on tap, it’s both a destination and an institution. The menu impressively contains everything from the pub grub to raw oysters and specialty po-boys, and the French fries come with many toppings, like roast beef debris gravy and bacon.
    Open till: Kitchen: 1 a.m.; Bar: Till (3 a.m. or so)

    Crêpes à la Cart
    1039 Broadway St.
    Located only a couple of blocks from Tulane University campus, this French-style crêperie offers over 50 kinds of crêpes — both sweet and savory. Breakfast crêpes (topped with egg, cheese, bacon, and other breakfast staples) are served all day. There are also offerings with smoked salmon, all kinds of cheese, and Nutella. You can pick from the extensive menu or build your own crêpe.
    Open till: Midnight or later.

    Cure
    4905 Freret St.
    The James Beard Foundation award-winning cocktail bar is a must-stop if you’re serious about your cocktails. In addition to serving all kinds of classics alongside its own versions, Cure also has a range of bar snacks, elevated small plates, and full-on entrees.
    Open till: Mon.-Thu.: Midnight; Fri.-Sat.: 2 a.m.

    Fresco Café & Pizzeria
    7625 Maple St.
    This pizzeria has a large menu of pizza, stromboli, sandwiches, pita wraps, and sides. One of the signature items are lavash rolls, served with rosemary potatoes, and filled with pulled pork or roasted eggplant.
    Open till: Sun.-Thu.: Midnight; Fri.-Sat.: 1 a.m.

    Hoshun
    1601 St. Charles Ave.
    Hoshun draws on the cuisines of China, Japan, Vietnam, and other south Asian countries. This makes Hoshun’s huge, globe-trotting menu of sushi, pho, General Tso’s chicken, and much more, perfect for late-night dining. Try one of the well-priced combo platters like Hunan shrimp.
    Open till: 2 a.m. daily.

    Midway Pizza
    4725 Freret St.
    This Uptown spot serves up 20 deep-dish signature pizzas (or you can build your own) alongside big salads and classic appetizers like pigs in the blanket. There’s also a full bar.
    Open till: Sun.-Thu.: 11 p.m.; Fri.-Sat.: Midnight.

    Raising Cane’s
    1406 St. Charles Ave.
    Sometimes only fast food would satisfy that late-night craving, and Raising Cane’s St. Charles Avenue location does it well with a quick turnaround and the chain’s specialties like fried chicken fingers, coleslaw, crinkle-cut fries, and Texas toast.
    Open till: 11 p.m. daily

    The Avenue Pub
    1732 St. Charles Ave.
    This iconic Lower Garden District pub boasts fireplaces, tin ceilings, a balcony overlooking St. Charles Avenue, a pool table, and sidewalk and patio seating. The downstairs bar is open 24/7 and the small kitchen churns out high-quality pub grub like cauliflower hummus and currywurst. The menu is limited and can’t accommodate food allergies, but Nathaniel Zimet of Boucherie is a consulting chef so some of his recipes, like Dump Truck Fries with bechamel and lemongrass pulled pork, grace the list. The house burger, 7 oz. of artisanal beef loaded with veggies and cheese, comes on challah bun from Gracious Bakery. For beer nerds, the daily tap rotating menu is posted online.
    Open till: Food: Sun.-Thu.: 2 a.m.; Fri.-Sat.: 4 a.m. The downstairs bar is open 24/7.

    The Delachaise
    3442 St. Charles Ave.
    This wine bar is famous for its wines by the glass (350 total, glass and bottle) and its French-inspired but ultimately international fare like housemade pâté and fried frogs legs with remoulade. The space is lovely and romantic, with a spacious patio.
    Open till: Mon.-Thu., Sun.: 1 a.m.; Fri.-Sat.: 2 a.m.

    Trolley Stop Cafe
    1923 St. Charles Ave.
    Another New Orleans landmark, Trolley Stop serves homestyle southern staples and all-day breakfast around the clock on weekends. It’s comfort food at its best, and super affordable.
    Open till: Sun.-Wed.: 2 a.m.; Thu.: 10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat.: Late night.

    Happy late-night dining!

  7. Staying Fit in Uptown New Orleans

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    Staying active and keeping fit could be a challenge while you’re traveling, especially in a city that loves to eat, drink and party. Whether you’re here on business or for pleasure, however, there are a few great options near the hotel to help you stay in shape.  

    Our guests have the opportunity to use the 24/7 Anytime Fitness center (4600 Freret St.) free of charge (it’s a five-minute walk from the hotel). Please stop by the front desk to check out a key.

    If you need a yoga fix, both Wild Lotus Yoga (4842 Perrier St.) and Swan River (5422 Magazine St.) accept walk-ins.

    We’re a pet-friendly hotel, and you and your dog will enjoy the urban oasis of the historic Audubon Park (6500 Magazine St.). It has a 1.8-mile jogging path, tennis courts, riding stables, soccer fields, plus an area behind the Audubon Zoo and along the Mississippi River called The Fly that is great for walking.

    For biking, whether you’d prefer to strike out on your own or be guided in a group, download a city bike map to help you navigate. The bike-sharing system called Blue Bikes has a few hubs in the area (find them on the map on the company website). For bike rentals Uptown, try Mike the Bike Guy (4411 Magazine St.), within cycling distance to Audubon Park, St. Charles Avenue, and the campuses of Tulane and Loyola universities. Arts District Bikes (1121 Margaret Pl.) offers night rides (rentals and guided).

    You can also always go for a leisurely swim in our sparkling pool.

  8. Where to Find Snoballs near the Alder Hotel in Uptown New Orleans

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    snoballs uptown new orleans
    Photo courtesy of Hansen’s Sno-Bliz on Facebook

    How do New Orleanians tolerate living in a subtropical climate where highs hover in 80s or 90s for six months out of the year? Central A.C. is a big part of it—and so are snoballs. These heavenly, frozen concoctions of finely shaved ice and flavored cane sugar syrup aren’t like the coarsely ground sno-cones or “water ices” of the North. Frankly, they’re much more delicious, which is why colorful sno-ball stands draw long lines from March through October.

    Recent years have seen an explosion in the number of snowball flavors, stuffings and toppings available. There are diet versions and “stuffed” (filled with soft-serve ice cream) versions. There are natural juice snoballs and creamy, evaporated milk-topped treats. In short, there’s a snoball for every palate. Here’s where to find them near the Alder Hotel.

    SnoWizard Snoball Shoppe (4001 Magazine Street)

    The standout snoball flavor at this stand is Mexican vanilla. It’s sweet, creamy and simple, with just a hint of cinnamon.

    Hansen’s Sno-Blitz (4801 Tchoupitoulas Street)

    The grand-daddy of snoball stands, Hansen’s has been family-owned since 1939. There’s almost always a line, but it’s more than worth the wait.

    Imperial Woodpecker Sno Balls (3511 Magazine Street)

    Classic, creamy, sugar-free and all natural flavors (strawberry-basil, watermelon-jalapeno) rub shoulders at Imperial Woodpecker.

    Plum Street Snoballs (1300 Burdette Street)

    Pink lemonade, bananas Foster, nectar cream and vanilla orchid cream are a few flavors you’ll find at this cash-only joint with ample outdoor seating.

    Red Rooster Snoball Stand (2801 Washington Avenue)

    Classic snoballs are joined by yakamein, crawfish nachos, seafood plates, po-boys and more.

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